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Akira Momota

Personal Details

First Name:Akira
Middle Name:
Last Name:Momota
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pmo343
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Faculty of Economics
Ritsumeikan University

Kyoto, Japan
http://www.ritsumei.jp/ec/index_j.html

:

1-1-1 Noji-Higashi Kusatsu Shiga 525-8577
RePEc:edi:ceritjp (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Akira Momota, 2015. "Intensive and Extensive Margins of Fertility, Capital Accumulation, and Economic Welfare," KIER Working Papers 917, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
  2. Momota, Akira & Horii, Ryo, 2011. "Timing of childbirth, capital accumulation, and economic welfare," MPRA Paper 34088, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Momota, Akira, 2016. "Intensive and extensive margins of fertility, capital accumulation, and economic welfare," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 90-110.
  2. Akira Momota & Ryo Horii, 2013. "Timing of childbirth, capital accumulation, and economic welfare," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(2), pages 494-522, April.
  3. Momota, Akira, 2012. "Population aging and sectoral employment shares," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 115(3), pages 527-530.
  4. Momota, Akira, 2009. "A population-macroeconomic growth model for currently developing countries," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 431-453, February.
  5. Momota, Akira & Futagami, Koichi, 2005. "Demographic structure, international lending and borrowing in growing interdependent economies," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 135-162, March.
  6. Momota, Akira & Tabata, Ken & Futagami, Koichi, 2005. "Infectious disease and preventive behavior in an overlapping generations model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 29(10), pages 1673-1700, October.
  7. Momota, Akira & Maeda, Yasuo, 2004. "The effect of solvency regulation to a bank," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 163-191, April.
  8. Momota, Akira, 2003. "A retirement decision in the presence of a social security system," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 73-86, March.
  9. Yasuo Maeda & Akira Momota, 2002. "Health Status Risks and the Efficiency of Social Security Systems," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 53(3), pages 350-367.
  10. Momota, Akira & Futagami, Koichi, 2000. "Demographic transition pattern in a small country," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 231-237, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Akira Momota, 2015. "Intensive and Extensive Margins of Fertility, Capital Accumulation, and Economic Welfare," KIER Working Papers 917, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.

    Cited by:

    1. Joanna Tyrowicz & Magdalena Smyk & Lucas van der Velde, 2018. "A cautionary note on the reliability of the online survey data – the case of Wage Indicator," GRAPE Working Papers 26, GRAPE Group for Research in Applied Economics.
    2. Johanna Etner & Natacha Raffin & Thomas Seegmuller, 2016. "The falling sperm counts story": A limit to growth?," EconomiX Working Papers 2016-36, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.

  2. Momota, Akira & Horii, Ryo, 2011. "Timing of childbirth, capital accumulation, and economic welfare," MPRA Paper 34088, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Momota, Akira, 2016. "Intensive and extensive margins of fertility, capital accumulation, and economic welfare," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 90-110.
    2. Hippolyte D'Albis & Angela Greulich & Grégory Ponthière, 2017. "Development, fertility and childbearing age: A unified growth theory," PSE Working Papers halshs-01452846, HAL.

Articles

  1. Momota, Akira, 2016. "Intensive and extensive margins of fertility, capital accumulation, and economic welfare," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 90-110.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Akira Momota & Ryo Horii, 2013. "Timing of childbirth, capital accumulation, and economic welfare," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(2), pages 494-522, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Momota, Akira, 2009. "A population-macroeconomic growth model for currently developing countries," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 431-453, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Jayanta Sarkar & Dipanwita Sarkar, 2016. "Why Does Child Labor Persist With Declining Poverty?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(1), pages 139-158, January.
    2. Boucekkine, R. & Martínez, B. & Ruiz-Tamarit, J.R., 2013. "Growth vs. level effect of population change on economic development: An inspection into human-capital-related mechanisms," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 312-334.
    3. Kuwahara, Shiro, 2013. "Does international knowledge spillover always lead to a positive trickle down?," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 48-63.
    4. Debasis Bandyopadhyay & Xueli Tang, 2011. "Parental nurturing and adverse effects of redistribution," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 71-98, March.
    5. Amin Gharipour & Morteza Sameti & Ali Yousefian, 2010. "A Comparative Approximate Economic Behavior Analysis of Support Vector Machines and Neural Networks Models," Iranian Economic Review, Economics faculty of Tehran university, vol. 15(2), pages 17-40, spring.

  4. Momota, Akira & Futagami, Koichi, 2005. "Demographic structure, international lending and borrowing in growing interdependent economies," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 135-162, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Naito, Takumi & Zhao, Laixun, 2009. "Aging, transitional dynamics, and gains from trade," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(8), pages 1531-1542, August.
    2. Akira Yakita, 2014. "Effects of capital taxation on economies with different demographic changes: short term versus long term," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(1), pages 257-273, January.
    3. Gahramanov, Emin & Tang, Xueli, 2013. "A mixed blessing of lifespan heterogeneity," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 142-153.

  5. Momota, Akira & Tabata, Ken & Futagami, Koichi, 2005. "Infectious disease and preventive behavior in an overlapping generations model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 29(10), pages 1673-1700, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Chris Papageorgiou & Fidel Pérez Sebastián & Shankha Chakraborty, 2010. "Diseases, infection dynamics and development," Working Papers. Serie AD 2010-28, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    2. Andersen, Torben M & Bhattacharya, Joydeep, 2013. "A Dynamic Efficiency Rationale for Public Investment in the Health of the Young," Staff General Research Papers Archive 35872, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    3. Kawagishi, Taketo & Nakamoto, Yasuhiro, 2016. "Dynamic Analysis of Health Status in a Small Open Economy," MPRA Paper 73859, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Aadland, David & Finnoff, David, 2007. "Syphilis Cycles," MPRA Paper 8722, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Fidel Perez-Sebastian & Chris Papageorgiou & Shankha Chakraborty, 2008. "DISEASES AND DEVELOPMENT: A Theory of Infection Dynamics and Economic Behavior," 2008 Meeting Papers 777, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. Raouf Boucekkine & Jean-Pierre Laffargue, 2009. "On the distributional consequences of epidemics," Working Papers 2009_22, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
    7. Momota, Akira, 2009. "A population-macroeconomic growth model for currently developing countries," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 431-453, February.
    8. Augier, Laurent & Yaly, Amy, 2013. "Economic growth and disease in the OLG model: The HIV/AIDS case," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 471-481.
    9. Shin, Inyong, 2012. "The Effect of Pension on the Optimized Life Expectancy and Lifetime Utility Level," MPRA Paper 41375, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Sheikh Shahnawaz, 2011. "Infectious disease outbreak and trade policy formulation," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(4), pages 2959-2967.
    11. Jean-Claude Berthelemy & Josselin Thuilliez & Ogobara Doumbo & Jean Gaudart, 2013. "Malaria and protective behaviours: is there a malaria trap?," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) inserm-00838508, HAL.
    12. Horan, Richard D. & Fenichel, Eli P. & Finnoff, David & Wolf, Christopher A., 2015. "Managing dynamic epidemiological risks through trade," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 192-207.
    13. Marcello Basili & Filippo Belloc, 2012. "How to Measure the Economic Impact of Vector-Borne Diseases at a Country Level: An Assessment," Department of Economics University of Siena 648, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    14. Shin, Inyong, 2013. "The Effect of Compressed Demographic Transition and Demographic Gift on Economic Growth," MPRA Paper 45003, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Marcello Basili & Filippo Belloc, 2015. "How To Measure The Economic Impact Of Vector-Borne Diseases At Country Level," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(5), pages 896-916, December.
    16. Shin, Inyong, 2015. "Could pension system make us happier?," MPRA Paper 65116, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  6. Momota, Akira, 2003. "A retirement decision in the presence of a social security system," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 73-86, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Megumi Mochida, 2005. "Child Allowances, Fertility, and Uncertain Lifetime," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 05-11, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    2. Luciano Fanti, 2015. "Growth, PAYG pension systems crisis and mandatory age of retirement," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(2), pages 1160-1167.
    3. Peter J. Stauvermann & Jin Hu, 2018. "What can China Expect from an Increase of the Mandatory Retirement Age?," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 19(1), pages 229-246, May.
    4. Luciano Fanti, 2014. "Raising the Mandatory Retirement Age and its Effect on Long-run Income and Pay-as-you-go (PAYG) Pensions," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(4), pages 619-645, November.
    5. Luciano Fanti, 2012. "Consequences of a boost of mandatory retirement age on long run income and PAYG pensions," Discussion Papers 2012/149, Dipartimento di Economia e Management (DEM), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    6. Fanti, Luciano & Gori, Luca, 2010. "Complex equilibrium dynamics in a simple OLG model of neoclassical growth with endogenous retirement age and public pensions," MPRA Paper 23694, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  7. Yasuo Maeda & Akira Momota, 2002. "Health Status Risks and the Efficiency of Social Security Systems," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 53(3), pages 350-367.

    Cited by:

    1. Momota, Akira, 2003. "A retirement decision in the presence of a social security system," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 73-86, March.

  8. Momota, Akira & Futagami, Koichi, 2000. "Demographic transition pattern in a small country," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 231-237, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Rodrigo R. Soares, 2004. "Mortality Reductions, Educational Attainment, and Fertility Choice," Econometric Society 2004 North American Winter Meetings 9, Econometric Society.
    2. Heijdra, Ben J. & Ligthart, Jenny E., 2006. "The Macroeconomic Dynamics Of Demographic Shocks," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(03), pages 349-370, June.
    3. Luciano Fanati & Piero Manfredi, 2003. "Population, Unemployment and Economic Growth Cycles: A Further Explanatory Perspective," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(2-3), pages 179-207, May.
    4. Leonid Azarnert, 2006. "Child mortality, fertility, and human capital accumulation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 19(2), pages 285-297, June.
    5. Momota, Akira & Futagami, Koichi, 2005. "Demographic structure, international lending and borrowing in growing interdependent economies," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 135-162, March.
    6. Fanti, Luciano & Manfredi, Piero, 2009. "Neoclassical production theory and growth with unemployment: The stability issue revisited," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 126-135, June.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (2) 2011-10-22 2015-04-25
  2. NEP-CIS: Confederation of Independent States (1) 2011-10-22
  3. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2011-10-22
  4. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (1) 2015-04-25
  5. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2015-04-25

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