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Tim Leunig

Personal Details

First Name:Tim
Middle Name:
Last Name:Leunig
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ple341
http://www.leunig.net
Twitter: @timleunig

Affiliation

(90%) Department of Economic History
London School of Economics (LSE)

London, United Kingdom
http://www.lse.ac.uk/economicHistory/

: +44 (0) 20 7955 7084

Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE
RePEc:edi:chlseuk (more details at EDIRC)

(10%) Centre for Economic Performance (CEP)
London School of Economics (LSE)

London, United Kingdom
http://cep.lse.ac.uk/

: +44(0)20-7955 7284
+44(0)20-7955 7595
Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE
RePEc:edi:celseuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Alexander Klein & Tim Leunig, 2013. "Gibrat's law and the British Industrial Revolution," Studies in Economics 1314, School of Economics, University of Kent.
  2. Björn Erikssoon & Tobias Karlsson & Tim Leunig & Maria Stanfors, 2012. "Sexism at work," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 385, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  3. Björn Eriksson & Tobias Karlsson & Tim Leunig & Maria Stanfors, 2011. "Gender, Productivity and the Nature of Work and Pay: Evidence from the Late Nineteenth-Century Tobacco Industry," CEP Discussion Papers dp1053, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  4. Tim Leunig & Joachim Voth, 2011. "Spinning Welfare: the Gains from Process Innovation in Cotton and Car Production," CEP Discussion Papers dp1050, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  5. Tim Leunig & Joachim Voth, 2011. "In brief...Cotton and Cars: the Huge Gains from Process Innovation," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 347, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  6. Leunig, Tim, 2011. "Measuring economic performance and social progress," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 37234, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  7. Tim Leunig, 2011. "Cart or Horse: Transport and Economic Growth," International Transport Forum Discussion Papers 2011/4, OECD Publishing.
  8. Leunig, Tim, 2010. "Social savings," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 30135, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  9. Crafts, Nicholas & Leunig, Tim & Mulatu, Abay, 2010. "Were British railway companies well-managed in the early twentieth century?," Economic History Working Papers 27889, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  10. Tim Leunig & Chris Minns & Patrick Wallis, 2009. "Networks in the Premodern Economy: the Market for London Apprenticeships, 1600-1749," CEP Discussion Papers dp0956, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  11. Tim Leunig, 2009. "In brief: Train times," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 275, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  12. Tim Leunig, 2008. "Where To Build Britain's New Houses," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 257, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  13. J.Humphries & T. Leunig, 2007. "Cities, Market Integration and Going to Sea: Stunting and the standard of living in early nineteenth-century England and Wales," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _066, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  14. Humphries, Jane & Leunig, Tim, 2007. "Was Dick Whittington taller than those he left behind?: anthropometric measures, migration and the quality of life in early nineteenth century London," Economic History Working Papers 22317, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  15. Leunig, Tim & Voth, Hans-Joachim, 2006. "Comment on Oxley’s "Seat of death and terror"," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 500, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  16. Leunig, Tim, 2005. "Time is money: a re-assessment of the passenger social savings from Victorian British railways," Economic History Working Papers 22551, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  17. Leunig, Tim, 2003. "Piece rates and learning: understanding work and production in the New England textile industry a century ago," Economic History Working Papers 22360, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  18. Leunig, Tim, 2003. "A British industrial success: productivity in the Lancashire and New England cotton spinning industries a century ago," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 494, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  19. Leunig, Tim, 2002. "Can profitable arbitrage opportunities in the raw cotton market explain Britain’s continued preference for mule spinning?," Economic History Working Papers 515, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  20. Leunig, Tim & Voth, Hans-Joachim, 2001. "Smallpox really did reduce height : a reply to Razzell," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 496, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  21. Leunig, Tim, 2001. "Britannia ruled the waves," Economic History Working Papers 536, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  22. Leunig, Tim, 2000. "New answers to old questions: explaining the slow adoption of ring spinning in Lancashire, 1880-1913," Economic History Working Papers 22378, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  23. Leunig, Tim & Voth, Hans-Joachim, 1998. "Smallpox did reduce height : a reply to our critics," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 495, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  24. Tim Leunig, 1998. "New Answers to Old Questions: Transport Costs and the Slow Adoption of Ring Spinning in Lancashire," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _022, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  25. Voth, Hans-Joachim & Leunig, Tim, 1996. "Did smallpox reduce height?: stature and the standard of living in London, 1770-1873," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 497, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    repec:oxf:wpaper:1998-w22 is not listed on IDEAS
    repec:oxf:wpaper:2007-w66 is not listed on IDEAS

Articles

  1. Maria Stanfors & Tim Leunig & Björn Eriksson & Tobias Karlsson, 2014. "Gender, productivity, and the nature of work and pay: evidence from the late nineteenth-century tobacco industry," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(1), pages 48-65, February.
  2. Tim Leunig, 2012. "The Liberal Democrats And Supply-Side Economics," Economic Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(2), pages 17-20, June.
  3. Nicholas Crafts & Timothy Leunig & Abay Mulatu, 2011. "Corrigendum: Were British railway companies well managed in the early twentieth century?," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 64(1), pages 351-356, February.
  4. Leunig, Tim, 2011. "Measuring economic performance and social progress," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(02), pages 357-363, August.
  5. Leunig, Tim & Minns, Chris & Wallis, Patrick, 2011. "Networks in the Premodern Economy: The Market for London Apprenticeships, 1600–1749," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 71(02), pages 413-443, June.
  6. Tim Leunig, 2010. "Social Savings," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(5), pages 775-800, December.
  7. Steckel, Richard H. & Leunig, Tim, 2010. "Preface," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 259-259, July.
  8. Humphries, Jane & Leunig, Timothy, 2009. "Was Dick Whittington taller than those he left behind? Anthropometric measures, migration and the quality of life in early nineteenth century London?," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 120-131, January.
  9. Jane Humphries & Tim Leunig, 2009. "Cities, market integration, and going to sea: stunting and the standard of living in early nineteenth-century England and Wales -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 62(2), pages 458-478, May.
  10. Tim Leunig & Henry Overman, 2008. "Spatial patterns of development and the British housing market," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(1), pages 59-78, spring.
  11. Nicholas Crafts & Timothy Leunig & Abay Mulatu, 2008. "Were British railway companies well managed in the early twentieth century? -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 61(4), pages 842-866, November.
  12. Leunig, Tim, 2007. "Robert Millward. Private and Public Enterprise in Europe: Energy, Telecommunications and Transport, 1830–1990. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2005. xix + 351 pp. ISBN 0521835240, $90.00 (c," Enterprise & Society, Cambridge University Press, vol. 8(01), pages 188-190, March.
  13. Leunig, Timothy, 2006. "Time is Money: A Re-Assessment of the Passenger Social Savings from Victorian British Railways," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(03), pages 635-673, September.
  14. Timothy Leunig & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2006. "Comment on 'Seat of Death and Terror' -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 59(3), pages 607-616, August.
  15. Timothy Leunig, 2003. "A British industrial success: productivity in the Lancashire and New England cotton spinning industries a century ago," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 56(1), pages 90-117, February.
  16. Leunig, Timothy, 2001. "NEW ANSWERS TO OLD QUESTIONS: EXPLAINING THE SLOW ADOPTION OF RING SPINNING IN LANCASHIRE, 1880 l913," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 61(02), pages 439-466, June.
  17. Timothy Leunig & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2001. "Smallpox really did reduce height: a reply to Razzell," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 54(1), pages 110-114, February.
  18. Leunig, Tim, 1999. "The Prothictivity Race: BritishManifacturingin International Perspective, 1850–1990. By S. N. Broadberry. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997. Pp. xxv, 451. £45.00, $74.95," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 59(01), pages 215-216, March.
  19. Timothy Leunig & Hans-Joachim Voth, 1998. "Smallpox Did Reduce Height: A Reply to Our Critics," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 51(2), pages 372-381, May.
  20. Leunig, Tim, 1998. "The People and the British Economy, 1830–1914. By Roderick Floud. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997. Pp. x, 218. $15.95, paper," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 58(03), pages 881-882, September.
  21. Leunig, Tim, 1997. "The Lancashire Cotton Industry: A History Since 1700. Edited by Mary Rose. Preston: Lancashire County Books, 1996. Pp. xii, 404. £24.95, cloth; £14.95, paper," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(04), pages 964-965, December.
  22. Hans-Joachim Voth & Timothy Leunig, 1996. "Did smallpox reduce height? Stature and the standard of living in London, 1770-1873," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 49(3), pages 541-560, August.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Leunig, Tim, 2003. "Piece rates and learning: understanding work and production in the New England textile industry a century ago," Economic History Working Papers 22360, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Labour repression & the Indo-Japanese divergence
      by pseudoerasmus in Pseudoerasmus on 2017-10-02 06:04:55

Working papers

  1. Björn Eriksson & Tobias Karlsson & Tim Leunig & Maria Stanfors, 2011. "Gender, Productivity and the Nature of Work and Pay: Evidence from the Late Nineteenth-Century Tobacco Industry," CEP Discussion Papers dp1053, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

    Cited by:

    1. Burnette, Joyce & Stanfors, Stanfors, 2018. "Understanding the gender gap among turn-of-the-century Swedish compositors," Working Paper Series 2018:1, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    2. Eriksson, Björn & Stanfors, Maria, 2014. "A Winning Strategy? The employment of women and firm longevity during industrialization," Lund Papers in Economic History 136, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    3. Karlsson, Tobias & Stanfors, Maria, 2016. "To be or not to be? Risk attitudes and gender differences in union membership," Lund Papers in Economic History 144, Lund University, Department of Economic History.

  2. Leunig, Tim, 2010. "Social savings," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 30135, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Lydon, Rio, 2012. "The eighth wonder of the world: how might access for vehicles have prevented the economic failure of the Thames Tunnel 1843-1865?," Economic History Working Papers 47804, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    2. Tim Leunig, 2011. "Cart or Horse: Transport and Economic Growth," International Transport Forum Discussion Papers 2011/4, OECD Publishing.
    3. John Tang, 2013. "Railroad expansion and entrepreneurship: evidence from Meiji Japan," CEH Discussion Papers 011, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    4. Brunt, Liam & Cannon, Edmund, 2013. "Integration in the English wheat market 1770-1820," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 12/2013, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    5. Herranz-Loncan, Alfonso, 2011. "The contribution of railways to economic growth in Latin America before 1914: a growth accounting approach," MPRA Paper 33578, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Peter J. Buckley, 2016. "Historical Research Approaches to the Analysis of Internationalisation," Management International Review, Springer, vol. 56(6), pages 879-900, December.

  3. Crafts, Nicholas & Leunig, Tim & Mulatu, Abay, 2010. "Were British railway companies well-managed in the early twentieth century?," Economic History Working Papers 27889, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.

    Cited by:

    1. Crafts, Nicholas, 2011. "British Relative Economic Decline Revisited," CEPR Discussion Papers 8384, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

  4. Tim Leunig & Chris Minns & Patrick Wallis, 2009. "Networks in the Premodern Economy: the Market for London Apprenticeships, 1600-1749," CEP Discussion Papers dp0956, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

    Cited by:

    1. de la Croix, David & Schneider, Eric & Weisdorf, Jacob, 2017. "'Decessit sine prole' - Childlessness, Celibacy, and Survival of the Richest in Pre-Industrial England," CEPR Discussion Papers 11752, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Nicholas Oulton & Ana Rincon-Aznar, 2009. "Rates of Return and Alternative Measures of Capital Input: 14 Countries and 10 Branches, 1971-2005," CEP Discussion Papers dp0957, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Gani Aldashev & Catherine Guirkinger, 2016. "Colonization and Changing Social Structure: Kazakhstan 1896-1910," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2016-10, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    4. Marc Klemp & Chris Minns & Patrick Wallis & Jacob Weisdorf, 2012. "Family Investment Strategies in Pre-modern Societies: Human Capital, Migration, and Birth Order in Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century England," Working Papers 0018, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    5. de la Croix, David & Doepke, Matthias & Mokyr, Joel, 2016. "Clans, Guilds, and Markets: Apprenticeship Institutions and Growth in the Pre-Industrial Economy," CEPR Discussion Papers 11199, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Minns, Chris & Wallis, Patrick, 2013. "The price of human capital in a pre-industrial economy: Premiums and apprenticeship contracts in 18th century England," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 335-350.
    7. Aldashev, Gani & Guirkinger, Catherine, 2017. "Colonization and changing social structure: Evidence from Kazakhstan," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 413-430.
    8. Matthias Doepke & Joel Mokyr & David de la Croix, 2013. "Apprenticeship and Technological Progress in the Malthusian World," 2013 Meeting Papers 76, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    9. Marc Klemp & Chris Minns & Patrick Wallis & Jacob Weisdorf, 2013. "Picking winners? The effect of birth order and migration on parental human capital investments in pre-modern England," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(2), pages 210-232, May.
    10. Minns, Chris & Wallis, Patrick, 2011. "Why did (pre‐industrial) firms train?: premiums and apprenticeship contracts in 18th century England," Economic History Working Papers 41348, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    11. Klemp, Marc P B & Weisdorf, Jacob, 2012. "Fecundity, Fertility and Family Reconstitution Data: The Child Quantity-Quality Trade-O Revisite," CEPR Discussion Papers 9121, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

  5. Humphries, Jane & Leunig, Tim, 2007. "Was Dick Whittington taller than those he left behind?: anthropometric measures, migration and the quality of life in early nineteenth century London," Economic History Working Papers 22317, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.

    Cited by:

    1. Breschi, M. & Fornasin, A. & Manfredini, M. & Mazzoni, S. & Pozzi, L., 2011. "Socioeconomic conditions, health and mortality from birth to adulthood, Alghero 1866-1925," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 366-375, July.
    2. de Beer, Hans, 2016. "The biological standard of living in Suriname, c. 1870–1975," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 140-154.
    3. Kesztenbaum, Lionel & Rosenthal, Jean-Laurent, 2011. "The health cost of living in a city: The case of France at the end of the 19th century," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 207-225, April.
    4. Stolz, Yvonne & Baten, Joerg, 2012. "Brain drain in the age of mass migration: Does relative inequality explain migrant selectivity?," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 205-220.
    5. Richard H. Steckel, 2008. "Heights and Human Welfare: Recent Developments and New Directions," NBER Working Papers 14536, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Gilles Postel-Vinay & David E. Sahn, 2010. "Explaining stunting in nineteenth-century France," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(2), pages 315-334, May.
    7. Anderson, Peter, 2018. "‘Tall and lithe’–The wage-height premium in the Victorian and Edwardian British railway industry," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 152-162.
    8. Stolz, Yvonne & Baten, Jörg & Botelho, Tarcísio, 2011. "Growth effects of 19th century mass migrations: "Fome Zero" for Brazil," University of Tuebingen Working Papers in Economics and Finance 20, University of Tuebingen, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences.

  6. Leunig, Tim & Voth, Hans-Joachim, 2006. "Comment on Oxley’s "Seat of death and terror"," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 500, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Carson, Scott Alan, 2011. "Was the 19th century stature-insolation relationship similar across independent samples? Evidence from soldiers and prisoners," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 199-207, April.

  7. Leunig, Tim, 2005. "Time is money: a re-assessment of the passenger social savings from Victorian British railways," Economic History Working Papers 22551, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.

    Cited by:

    1. Dave Donaldson & Richard Hornbeck, 2016. "Railroads and American Economic Growth: A "Market Access" Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 131(2), pages 799-858.
    2. Klein, Alexander & Leunig, Tim, 2015. "Gibrat’s law and the British industrial revolution," Economic History Working Papers 62159, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    3. Miles, David K & Sefton, James, 2017. "Houses across time and across place," CEPR Discussion Papers 12103, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Brian Mitchell & David Chambers & Nick Crafts, 2011. "How good was the profitability of British railways, 1870–1912?," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 64(3), pages 798-831, August.
    5. Bakker, Gerben, 2009. "Time and productivity growth in services: how motion pictures industrialized entertainment," Economic History Working Papers 27866, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    6. Campbell, Gareth, 2012. "Myopic rationality in a Mania," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 75-91.
    7. Tim Leunig & Joachim Voth, 2011. "Spinning welfare: The gains from process innovation in cotton and car production," Economics Working Papers 1352, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    8. Fouquet, Roger, 2012. "Trends in income and price elasticities of transport demand (1850–2010)," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 62-71.
    9. Lydon, Rio, 2012. "The eighth wonder of the world: how might access for vehicles have prevented the economic failure of the Thames Tunnel 1843-1865?," Economic History Working Papers 47804, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    10. Broadberry Stephen, 2012. "Recent Developments in the Theory of Very Long Run Growth: A Historical Appraisal," Jahrbuch für Wirtschaftsgeschichte / Economic History Yearbook, De Gruyter, vol. 53(1), pages 277-306, May.
    11. Tim Leunig, 2011. "Cart or Horse: Transport and Economic Growth," International Transport Forum Discussion Papers 2011/4, OECD Publishing.
    12. Dan Bogart, 2011. "Did the Glorious Revolution contribute to the transport revolution? Evidence from investment in roads and rivers," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 64(4), pages 1073-1112, November.
    13. Broadberry Stephen & Fremdling Rainer & Solar Peter M., 2008. "European Industry 1700-1870," Jahrbuch für Wirtschaftsgeschichte / Economic History Yearbook, De Gruyter, vol. 49(2), pages 141-171, December.
    14. Thor Berger & Kerstin Enflo, 2013. "Locomotives of Local Growth: The Short- and Long-Term Impact of Railroads in Sweden," Working Papers 0042, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    15. Bogart, Dan, 2010. "A global perspective on railway inefficiency and the rise of state ownership, 1880-1912," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 158-178, April.
    16. Nicholas Crafts & Timothy Leunig & Abay Mulatu, 2008. "Were British railway companies well managed in the early twentieth century? -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 61(4), pages 842-866, November.
    17. Nicholas Crafts, 2010. "Cliometrics and technological change: a survey," The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(5), pages 1127-1147.
    18. Dorian Gerhold, 2014. "The development of stage coaching and the impact of turnpike roads, 1653–1840," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(3), pages 818-845, August.
    19. Fouquet, Roger, 2014. "Long run demand for energy services: income and price elasticities over two hundred years," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 59070, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    20. Dan Bogart, 2013. "The Transportation Revolution in Industrializing Britain: A Survey," Working Papers 121306, University of California-Irvine, Department of Economics.
    21. Roger Fouquet, 2013. "Long Run Demand for Energy Services: the Role of Economic and Technological Development," Working Papers 2013-03, BC3.

  8. Leunig, Tim, 2003. "Piece rates and learning: understanding work and production in the New England textile industry a century ago," Economic History Working Papers 22360, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.

    Cited by:

    1. Domenech, Jordi, 2005. "Labour market adjustment to economic downturns in the Catalan textile industry, 1880-1910: did employers breach implicit contracts?," Economic History Working Papers 22333, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    2. Joel Mokyr & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2006. "Understanding Growth in Europe, 1700-1870: Theory and Evidence," DEGIT Conference Papers c011_002, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    3. James Bessen, 2009. "More Machines, Better Machines...Or Better Workers?," Working Papers 0803, Research on Innovation.

  9. Leunig, Tim, 2003. "A British industrial success: productivity in the Lancashire and New England cotton spinning industries a century ago," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 494, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Broadberry, Stephen & Burhop, Carsten, 2008. "Resolving The Anglo-German Industrial Productivity Puzzle, 1895-1935: A Response To Professor Ritschl," Economic Research Papers 269846, University of Warwick - Department of Economics.
    2. Klein, Alexander & Leunig, Tim, 2015. "Gibrat’s law and the British industrial revolution," Economic History Working Papers 62159, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    3. Ciliberto, Federico, 2009. "Were British Cotton Entrepreneurs Technologically Backward? Firm-Level Evidence on the Adoption of Ring-Spinning," MPRA Paper 18533, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Nicholas Crafts & Nikolaus Wolf, 2013. "The Location of the UK Cotton Textiles Industry in 1838: a Quantitative Analysis," Working Papers 0045, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    5. Crafts, Nicholas, 2012. "British relative economic decline revisited: The role of competition," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 17-29.
    6. Crafts, Nicholas, 2011. "British Relative Economic Decline Revisited," CEPR Discussion Papers 8384, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Joel Mokyr & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2006. "Understanding Growth in Europe, 1700-1870: Theory and Evidence," DEGIT Conference Papers c011_002, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    8. Jong, H. de & Woltjer, P., 2009. "A Comparison of Real Output and Productivity for British and American Manufacturing in 1935," GGDC Research Memorandum GD-108, Groningen Growth and Development Centre, University of Groningen.
    9. Theo Balderston, 2010. "The economics of abundance: coal and cotton in Lancashire and the world," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(3), pages 569-590, August.
    10. Leslie Hannah, 2007. "Logistics, Market Size and Giant Plants in the Early 20th Century: A Global View," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-486, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.

  10. Leunig, Tim & Voth, Hans-Joachim, 2001. "Smallpox really did reduce height : a reply to Razzell," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 496, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Horrell, Sara & Meredith, David & Oxley, Deborah, 2009. "Measuring misery: Body mass, ageing and gender inequality in Victorian London," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 93-119, January.
    2. Richard H. Steckel, 2008. "Heights and Human Welfare: Recent Developments and New Directions," NBER Working Papers 14536, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Galofré-Vilà, Gregori, 2018. "Growth and maturity: A quantitative systematic review and network analysis in anthropometric history," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 107-118.

  11. Leunig, Tim, 2001. "Britannia ruled the waves," Economic History Working Papers 536, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.

    Cited by:

    1. Michael Hinton & Thomas Barbiero, 2012. "Is Protection Good or Bad for Growth? Lessons from Canada's Cotton Textile Mills," Working Papers 036, Ryerson University, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2012.

  12. Leunig, Tim, 2000. "New answers to old questions: explaining the slow adoption of ring spinning in Lancashire, 1880-1913," Economic History Working Papers 22378, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.

    Cited by:

    1. Ciliberto, Federico, 2009. "Were British Cotton Entrepreneurs Technologically Backward? Firm-Level Evidence on the Adoption of Ring-Spinning," MPRA Paper 18533, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Tim Leunig & Joachim Voth, 2011. "Spinning welfare: The gains from process innovation in cotton and car production," Economics Working Papers 1352, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    3. Leunig, Tim, 2002. "Can profitable arbitrage opportunities in the raw cotton market explain Britain’s continued preference for mule spinning?," Economic History Working Papers 515, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    4. Crafts, Nicholas, 2012. "British relative economic decline revisited: The role of competition," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 17-29.
    5. Crafts, Nicholas, 2011. "British Relative Economic Decline Revisited," CEPR Discussion Papers 8384, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Christopher Spencer & Paul Temple, 2012. "Alternative Paths of Learning: Standardisation and Growth in Britain, 1901-2009," Discussion Paper Series 2012_10, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Oct 2012.
    7. Crafts, Nicholas & O’Rourke, Kevin Hjortshøj, 2014. "Twentieth Century Growth*This research has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) / ERC grant agreement no. 249546.," Handbook of Economic Growth,in: Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 6, pages 263-346 Elsevier.
    8. Joan R. Rosés, 2009. "Subcontracting and vertical integration in the Spanish cotton industry -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 62(1), pages 45-72, February.

  13. Leunig, Tim & Voth, Hans-Joachim, 1998. "Smallpox did reduce height : a reply to our critics," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 495, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Horrell, Sara & Meredith, David & Oxley, Deborah, 2009. "Measuring misery: Body mass, ageing and gender inequality in Victorian London," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 93-119, January.
    2. Richard H. Steckel, 2008. "Heights and Human Welfare: Recent Developments and New Directions," NBER Working Papers 14536, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Galofré-Vilà, Gregori, 2018. "Growth and maturity: A quantitative systematic review and network analysis in anthropometric history," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 107-118.

  14. Voth, Hans-Joachim & Leunig, Tim, 1996. "Did smallpox reduce height?: stature and the standard of living in London, 1770-1873," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 497, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Arora Suchit, 2012. "Understanding Aging during the Epidemiologic Transition," Working Papers 12-07, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
    2. Howard Bodenhorn & Timothy W. Guinnane & Thomas A. Mroz, 2015. "Sample-selection biases and the “industrialization puzzle”," NBER Working Papers 21249, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Humphries, Jane & Leunig, Timothy, 2009. "Was Dick Whittington taller than those he left behind? Anthropometric measures, migration and the quality of life in early nineteenth century London?," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 120-131, January.
    4. Izdebski, Adam & Koloch, Grzegorz & Słoczyński, Tymon & Tycner-Wolicka, Marta, 2014. "On the Use of Palynological Data in Economic History: New Methods and an Application to Agricultural Output in Central Europe, 0–2000 AD," MPRA Paper 54582, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Crafts, Nicholas, 1997. "Some dimensions of the 'quality of life' during the British industrial revolution," Economic History Working Papers 20349, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    6. Richard H. Steckel, 2008. "Heights and Human Welfare: Recent Developments and New Directions," NBER Working Papers 14536, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Alasdair  Crockett, 2000. "Variations in Churchgoing Rates in England in 1851: Supply-side Deficiency or Demand-led Decline?," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _036, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    8. Galofré-Vilà, Gregori, 2018. "Growth and maturity: A quantitative systematic review and network analysis in anthropometric history," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 107-118.
    9. Jacobs, Jan & Tassenaar, Vincent, 2003. "Height, income, and nutrition in the Netherlands: the second half of the 19th century," Research Report 03C35, University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management).
    10. Liam Brunt, 1999. "An Arbitrage Model in Crop Rotation in 18th Century England," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _032, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    11. Federico Varese & Meir Yaish, 1998. "Altruism: The Importance of being Asked. The Rescue of Jews in Nazi Europe," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _024, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    12. Alasdair Crockett, 2000. "Variations in Churchgoing Rates in England in 1851: Supply-side Deficiency or Demand-led Decline," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _036, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    13. Paul A. David & Gavin Wright, "undated". "General Purpose Technologies and Surges in Productivity: Historical Reflections on the Future of the ICT Revolution," Working Papers 99026, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
    14. Salam Abdus & Peter Rangazas, 2011. "Adult Nutrition and Growth," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 14(4), pages 636-649, October.
    15. Paul David & Gavin Wright, 1999. "General Purpose Technologies and Surges in Productivity: Historical Reflections on the Future of the ICT Revolution," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _031, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    16. Jane Humphries & Tim Leunig, 2009. "Cities, market integration, and going to sea: stunting and the standard of living in early nineteenth-century England and Wales -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 62(2), pages 458-478, May.
    17. Howard Bodenhorn & Timothy W. Guinnane & Thomas A. Mroz, 2013. "Problems of Sample-selection Bias in the Historical Heights Literature: A Theoretical and Econometric Analysis," Working Papers 1023, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    18. Liam Brunt, 1999. "An Arbitrage Model in Crop Rotation in 18th Century England," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _032, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    19. Adolfo Meisel R. & Margarita Vega A., 2006. "Los orígenes de la antropometría histórica y su estado actual," Cuadernos de historia económica 003175, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA - ECONOMÍA REGIONAL.
    20. Philipp Ager & Casper Worm Hansen & Peter Sandholt Jensen, 2014. "Fertility and early-life mortality: Evidence from smallpox vaccination in Sweden," Working Papers 0058, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    21. Jun, Seong Ho & Lewis, James B. & Schwekendiek, Daniel, 2017. "The biological standard of living in pre-modern Korea: Determinants of height of militia recruits during the Chosŏn dynasty," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 104-110.
    22. Aksan, Anna-Maria & Chakraborty, Shankha, 2014. "Mortality versus morbidity in the demographic transition," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 470-492.
    23. Howard Bodenhorn & Timothy Guinnane & Thomas Mroz, 2014. "Caveat Lector: Sample Selection in Historical Heights and the Interpretation of Early Industrializing Economies," NBER Working Papers 19955, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    24. Federico Varese & Meir Yaish, 1998. "Altruism:The Importance of Being Asked. The Rescue of Jews in Nazi Europe," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _024, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Maria Stanfors & Tim Leunig & Björn Eriksson & Tobias Karlsson, 2014. "Gender, productivity, and the nature of work and pay: evidence from the late nineteenth-century tobacco industry," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(1), pages 48-65, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Nicholas Crafts & Timothy Leunig & Abay Mulatu, 2011. "Corrigendum: Were British railway companies well managed in the early twentieth century?," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 64(1), pages 351-356, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Anderson, Peter, 2018. "‘Tall and lithe’–The wage-height premium in the Victorian and Edwardian British railway industry," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 152-162.

  3. Leunig, Tim & Minns, Chris & Wallis, Patrick, 2011. "Networks in the Premodern Economy: The Market for London Apprenticeships, 1600–1749," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 71(02), pages 413-443, June.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Tim Leunig, 2010. "Social Savings," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(5), pages 775-800, December.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Humphries, Jane & Leunig, Timothy, 2009. "Was Dick Whittington taller than those he left behind? Anthropometric measures, migration and the quality of life in early nineteenth century London?," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 120-131, January.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Jane Humphries & Tim Leunig, 2009. "Cities, market integration, and going to sea: stunting and the standard of living in early nineteenth-century England and Wales -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 62(2), pages 458-478, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Koepke, Nikola & Floris, Joël & Pfister, Christian & Rühli, Frank J. & Staub, Kaspar, 2018. "Ladies first: Female and male adult height in Switzerland, 1770–1930," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 76-87.
    2. Roy E. Bailey & Timothy J. Hatton & Kris Inwood, 2014. "Health, Height and the Household at the Turn of the 20th Century," CEH Discussion Papers 029, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    3. José Miguel Martínez-Carrión & Antonio D. Cámara, 2015. "Social Differentials in the Biological Standard of Living during the Decline of Industrialization in Andalusia: A District-level Analysis in Antequera," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1508, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica.

  7. Tim Leunig & Henry Overman, 2008. "Spatial patterns of development and the British housing market," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(1), pages 59-78, spring.

    Cited by:

    1. Rosés, Joan R. & Lampe, Markus & Carmona Pidal, Juan Antonio, 2011. "Spanish housing markets during the first phase of the rural-urban transition process," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH wp11-08, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
    2. Mojgan Hatami & Abu Hassan Abu Bakar & Nurwati Badarulzaman, 2013. "Impact of Migration on Housing Prices: A Case of Low-Income Households in Iran," Acta Universitatis Danubius. OEconomica, Danubius University of Galati, issue 9(1), pages 28-35, February.
    3. Cinzia Rienzo, 2017. "Real wages, wage inequality and the regional cost-of-living in the UK," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 52(4), pages 1309-1335, June.
    4. Rosés, Joan R. & Lampe, Markus & Carmona Pidal, Juan Antonio, 2012. "Housing markets during the rural-urban transition : evidence from early 20th century Spain," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH wp12-10, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
    5. Nicholas Crafts, 2013. "Returning to Growth: Policy Lessons from History," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 34(2), pages 255-282, June.
    6. ., 2014. "Urban economic performance," Chapters,in: Urban Economics and Urban Policy, chapter 2, pages 11-53 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Crafts, Nicholas, 2012. "Creating Competitive Advantage: Policy Lessons from History," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 91, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    8. Neil Lee & Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, 2013. "Innovation and spatial inequality in Europe and USA," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(1), pages 1-22, January.
    9. Lewis Dijkstra & Enrique Garcilazo & Philip McCann, 2013. "The Economic Performance of European Cities and City Regions: Myths and Realities," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(3), pages 334-354, March.

  8. Nicholas Crafts & Timothy Leunig & Abay Mulatu, 2008. "Were British railway companies well managed in the early twentieth century? -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 61(4), pages 842-866, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Brian Mitchell & David Chambers & Nick Crafts, 2011. "How good was the profitability of British railways, 1870–1912?," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 64(3), pages 798-831, August.
    2. Campbell, Gareth, 2012. "Myopic rationality in a Mania," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 75-91.
    3. Nicholas Crafts & Timothy Leunig & Abay Mulatu, 2011. "Corrigendum: Were British railway companies well managed in the early twentieth century?," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 64(1), pages 351-356, February.
    4. Crafts, Nicholas, 2012. "British relative economic decline revisited: The role of competition," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 17-29.
    5. Crafts, Nicholas, 2011. "British Relative Economic Decline Revisited," CEPR Discussion Papers 8384, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Mark Casson, 2014. "Government failures in railway public policy: the British case," Chapters,in: A Handbook of Alternative Theories of Public Economics, chapter 16, pages 368-399 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Bogart, Dan, 2010. "A global perspective on railway inefficiency and the rise of state ownership, 1880-1912," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 158-178, April.
    8. Marchetti, Dalmo & Wanke, Peter, 2017. "Brazil's rail freight transport: Efficiency analysis using two-stage DEA and cluster-driven public policies," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 26-42.

  9. Leunig, Timothy, 2006. "Time is Money: A Re-Assessment of the Passenger Social Savings from Victorian British Railways," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(03), pages 635-673, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  10. Timothy Leunig & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2006. "Comment on 'Seat of Death and Terror' -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 59(3), pages 607-616, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Richard H. Steckel, 2008. "Heights and Human Welfare: Recent Developments and New Directions," NBER Working Papers 14536, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  11. Timothy Leunig, 2003. "A British industrial success: productivity in the Lancashire and New England cotton spinning industries a century ago," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 56(1), pages 90-117, February. See citations under working paper version above.
  12. Leunig, Timothy, 2001. "NEW ANSWERS TO OLD QUESTIONS: EXPLAINING THE SLOW ADOPTION OF RING SPINNING IN LANCASHIRE, 1880 l913," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 61(02), pages 439-466, June.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  13. Timothy Leunig & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2001. "Smallpox really did reduce height: a reply to Razzell," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 54(1), pages 110-114, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  14. Timothy Leunig & Hans-Joachim Voth, 1998. "Smallpox Did Reduce Height: A Reply to Our Critics," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 51(2), pages 372-381, May.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  15. Hans-Joachim Voth & Timothy Leunig, 1996. "Did smallpox reduce height? Stature and the standard of living in London, 1770-1873," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 49(3), pages 541-560, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 12 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (11) 2008-05-10 2010-01-16 2011-05-30 2011-06-11 2011-11-07 2013-01-07 2013-09-06 2013-10-02 2014-04-18 2014-08-09 2015-06-05. Author is listed
  2. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (8) 2008-05-10 2010-01-16 2011-08-22 2013-09-06 2013-10-02 2014-04-18 2014-08-09 2015-06-05. Author is listed
  3. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (4) 2013-09-06 2013-10-02 2014-04-18 2015-06-05
  4. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (3) 2014-04-18 2014-08-09 2015-06-05
  5. NEP-SBM: Small Business Management (3) 2013-10-02 2014-04-18 2014-08-09
  6. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (2) 2013-01-07 2013-09-06
  7. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (2) 2011-06-11 2013-01-07
  8. NEP-INO: Innovation (2) 2011-05-30 2011-11-07
  9. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (2) 2011-06-11 2013-01-07
  10. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (1) 2011-08-22
  11. NEP-HME: Heterodox Microeconomics (1) 2011-06-11
  12. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2010-01-16

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