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Blessing M. Chiripanhura

Personal Details

First Name:Blessing
Middle Name:M.
Last Name:Chiripanhura
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pch394

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of Sheffield

Sheffield, United Kingdom
http://www.shef.ac.uk/economics/

: +44 114 222 3399
+ 44 (0)114 222 3458
9 Mappin Street, SHEFFIELD, S1 4DT
RePEc:edi:desheuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Chiripanhura, Blessing M. & Nino-Zarazua, Miguel, 2014. "Aid, political business cycles and growth in Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 145, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  2. Niño-Zarazúa, Miguel & Chiripanhura, Blessing, 2013. "The impacts of the food, fuel and financial crises on households in Nigeria. A retrospective approach for research enquiry," MPRA Paper 47348, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Paul Mosley & Blessing Chiripanhura, 2012. "The African Political Business Cycle: Varieties of Experience," Working Papers 2012002, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
  4. Blessing M. Chiripanhura, 2010. "Poverty traps and livelihood options in rural Zimbabwe:Evidence from three districts," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 12110, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
  5. Blessing Chiripanhura, 2005. "The Impacts Of Labour Market Liberalisation And Government Commitment To Reform: Zimbabwe, 1991-2000," Labor and Demography 0512013, EconWPA.

Articles

  1. Blessing M. Chiripanhura & Miguel Niño-Zarazúa, 2016. "The impacts of the food, fuel and financial crises on poor and vulnerable households in Nigeria: A retrospective approach to research inquiry," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 34(6), pages 763-788, November.
  2. Paul Mosley & Blessing Chiripanhura, 2016. "The African Political Business Cycle: Varieties of Experience," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(7), pages 917-932, July.
  3. Blessing Chiripanhura & Miguel Niño‐Zarazúa, 2015. "Aid, Political Business Cycles and Growth in Africa," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(8), pages 1387-1421, November.
  4. Blessing Chiripanhura, 2011. "Median and mean income analyses ‐ Their implications for material living standards and national well‐being," Economic & Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan;Office for National Statistics, vol. 5(2), pages 45-63, February.
  5. Blessing M. Chiripanhura, 2010. "Sneaking up and stumbling back: Textiles sector performance under crisis conditions in Zimbabwe," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(2), pages 153-175.
  6. Richard Jones & Blessing Chiripanhura, 2010. "Measuring the UK's human capital stock," Economic & Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan;Office for National Statistics, vol. 4(11), pages 36-63, November.
  7. Blessing Chiripanhura, 2010. "Measures of economic activity and their implications for societal well-being," Economic & Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan;Office for National Statistics, vol. 4(7), pages 56-65, July.
  8. Paul Mosley & Blessing Chiripanhura, 2009. "Liberalisation and poverty in Africa since 1990-Why is the operation of the 'invisible hand' uneven?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(6), pages 749-756.
  9. Sue Bowden & Blessing Chiripanhura & Paul Mosley, 2008. "Measuring and explaining poverty in six African countries: A long-period approach," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(8), pages 1049-1079.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Chiripanhura, Blessing M. & Nino-Zarazua, Miguel, 2014. "Aid, political business cycles and growth in Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 145, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    Cited by:

    1. Miguel Niño-Zarazúa, 2015. "Aid, education policy, and development," WIDER Working Paper Series 135, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Dragan Filipovich & Miguel Niño-Zarazúa & Alma Santillán Hernández, 2018. "Campaign externalities, programmatic spending, and voting preferences in rural Mexico: The case of Progresa-Oportunidades-Prospera programme," WIDER Working Paper Series 027, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Tony Addison & Miguel Niño‐Zarazúa & Finn Tarp, 2015. "Aid, Social Policy and Development," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(8), pages 1351-1365, November.
    4. Syed Mansoob Murshed & Muhammad Badiuzzaman & Mohammad Habibullah Pulok, 2017. "Fiscal capacity and social protection expenditure in developing nations," WIDER Working Paper Series 060, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

  2. Paul Mosley & Blessing Chiripanhura, 2012. "The African Political Business Cycle: Varieties of Experience," Working Papers 2012002, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Chiripanhura, Blessing M. & Nino-Zarazua, Miguel, 2014. "Aid, political business cycles and growth in Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 145, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Antoine Cazals & Pierre Mandon, 2015. "Political Budget Cycles: Manipulation of Leaders or Bias from Research? A Meta-Regression Analysis," Working Papers halshs-01238883, HAL.
    3. Antoine CAZALS & Pierre MANDON, 2016. "Political Budget Cycles: Manipulation from Leaders or Manipulation from Researchers? Evidence from a Meta-Regression Analysis," Working Papers 201609, CERDI.
    4. Antoine Cazals & Pierre Mandon, 2016. "Political Budget Cycles: Manipulation from Leaders or Manipulation from Researchers? Evidence from a Meta-Regression Analysis," Working Papers halshs-01320586, HAL.
    5. Resnick, Danielle, 2016. "Strong democracy, weak state: The political economy of Ghana’s stalled structural transformation," IFPRI discussion papers 1574, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

Articles

  1. Paul Mosley & Blessing Chiripanhura, 2016. "The African Political Business Cycle: Varieties of Experience," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(7), pages 917-932, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Blessing Chiripanhura & Miguel Niño‐Zarazúa, 2015. "Aid, Political Business Cycles and Growth in Africa," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(8), pages 1387-1421, November.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Richard Jones & Blessing Chiripanhura, 2010. "Measuring the UK's human capital stock," Economic & Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan;Office for National Statistics, vol. 4(11), pages 36-63, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Laverde, Henry, 2015. "Analysis of human capital by means of a prospective method: A study for Latin America," MPRA Paper 81633, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jul 2017.
    2. Michael S. Christian, 2017. "Net Investment and Stocks of Human Capital in the United States, 1975-2013," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 33, pages 128-149, Fall.
    3. Michael S. Christian, 2014. "Human Capital Accounting in the United States: Context, Measurement, and Application," NBER Chapters,in: Measuring Economic Sustainability and Progress, pages 461-491 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Neagu Olimpia, 2012. "The Market Value Of Human Capital: An Empirical Analysis," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(2), pages 256-264, December.
    5. Neagu Olimpia, 2012. "Labour Productivity And Human Capital In The Eu Countries:An Empirical Analys," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(1), pages 324-331, July.
    6. Myasoyedov, Sergei & Martirosyan, Emil & Sergeeva, Anastasia, 2015. "Modern Forms of Globalization of Human Capital - The New Trends in the Global Mobility of Staff," Published Papers 2312, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.
    7. Michael S. Christian, 2011. "Human Capital Accounting in the United States: Context, Measurement, and Application," BEA Working Papers 0073, Bureau of Economic Analysis.

  4. Blessing Chiripanhura, 2010. "Measures of economic activity and their implications for societal well-being," Economic & Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan;Office for National Statistics, vol. 4(7), pages 56-65, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Nepelski & Giuditta de Prato, 2014. "Identifying European Poles of Excellence: The Methodology," JRC Working Papers JRC85356, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).

  5. Paul Mosley & Blessing Chiripanhura, 2009. "Liberalisation and poverty in Africa since 1990-Why is the operation of the 'invisible hand' uneven?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(6), pages 749-756.

    Cited by:

    1. Paul Mosley, 2012. "The politics of what works for the poor in public expenditure and taxation: a review," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series esid-011-12, BWPI, The University of Manchester.

  6. Sue Bowden & Blessing Chiripanhura & Paul Mosley, 2008. "Measuring and explaining poverty in six African countries: A long-period approach," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(8), pages 1049-1079.

    Cited by:

    1. Papaioannou, Kostadis J. & de Haas, Michiel, 2017. "Weather Shocks and Agricultural Commercialization in Colonial Tropical Africa: Did Cash Crops Alleviate Social Distress?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 346-365.
    2. Prados de la Escosura, Leandro, 2013. "Human development in Africa: A long-run perspective," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 179-204.
    3. Paul Mosley, 2013. "Two Africas? Why Africa’s ‘Growth Miracle’ is barely reducing poverty," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 19113, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    4. Jerven , Morten & Austin , Gareth & Green, Erik & Uche , Chibuike & Frankema , Ewout & Fourie , Johan & Inikori , Joseph & Moradi , Alexander & Hillbom , Ellen, 2012. "Moving Forward in African Economic History: Bridging the Gap Between Methods and Sources," African Economic History Working Paper 1/2012, African Economic History Network.
    5. Fenske, James, 2014. "Trees, tenure and conflict: Rubber in colonial Benin," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 226-238.
    6. Ewout Frankema & Morten Jerven, 2014. "Writing history backwards or sideways: towards a consensus on African population, 1850–2010," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(4), pages 907-931, November.
    7. Alexander Moradi, 2008. "Confronting colonial legacies-lessons from human development in Ghana and Kenya, 1880-2000," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(8), pages 1107-1121.
    8. Richens, Peter, 2009. "The economic legacies of the ‘thin white line’: indirect rule and the comparative development of sub-Saharan Africa," Economic History Working Papers 27879, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    9. Ewout Frankema & Marlous van Waijenburg, 2011. "Structural Impediments to African Growth? New Evidence from Real Wages in British Africa, 1880-1965," Working Papers 0024, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History.
    10. Ewout Frankema & Marlous van Waijenburg, 2011. "African Real Wages in Asian Perspective, 1880-1940," Working Papers 0002, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History.
    11. Carlos Pestana Barros & Otavio Henrique dos Santos Figueiredo & Peter Fernades Wanke, 2016. "Peasants’ Poverty and Inequality in Angola," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(2), pages 751-761, September.
    12. Maravall Buckwalter, Laura, 2017. "Factor Endowments and Farm Structure : Algerian Settler Agriculture During the First Globalization (1870-1914)," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH 26085, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
    13. Pim de Zwart, 2011. "Real wages at the Cape of Good Hope: A long-term perspective, 1652-1912," Working Papers 0013, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History.
    14. Bolt, Jutta & Green, Erik, 2014. "Was the wage burden too heavy? Profitability and wage shares of settler agriculture in colonial Malawi, c 1900-1960," Lund Papers in Economic History 134, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    15. Kodila-Tedika, Oasis, 2013. "Esclavagisme et colonisation : Quelles conséquences contemporaines en Afrique ? - Résumé critique des travaux de l'économiste Nathan Nunn
      [Slavery and colonization: What contemporary consequences i
      ," MPRA Paper 43732, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Morten Jerven, 2014. "A West African experiment: constructing a GDP series for colonial Ghana, 1891–1950," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(4), pages 964-992, November.
    17. Gareth Austin, 2008. "The 'reversal of fortune' thesis and the compression of history: Perspectives from African and comparative economic history," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(8), pages 996-1027.
    18. Gareth Austin, 2014. "Vent for surplus or productivity breakthrough? The Ghanaian cocoa take-off, c. 1890–1936," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(4), pages 1035-1064, November.
    19. Sue Bowden & Paul Mosley, 2012. "Politics, Public Expenditure and the Evolution of Poverty in Africa 1920-2009," Working Papers 2012003, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    20. Sue Bowden & Paul Mosley, 2008. "Historical roots of poverty: A symposium," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(8), pages 987-995.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AFR: Africa (4) 2010-10-23 2012-03-21 2013-06-09 2015-01-03
  2. NEP-DEV: Development (3) 2006-01-01 2010-10-23 2012-03-21
  3. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (1) 2013-06-09
  4. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (1) 2015-01-03
  5. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2015-01-03
  6. NEP-PKE: Post Keynesian Economics (1) 2012-03-21
  7. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (1) 2015-01-03

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