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Jeff Chan

Personal Details

First Name:Jeff
Middle Name:
Last Name:Chan
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pch1252
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Department of Economics
School of Business and Economics
Wilfrid Laurier University

Waterloo, Canada
http://www.wlu.ca/homepage.php?grp_id=491
RePEc:edi:sbwluca (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Chan, Jeff, 2022. "Farming output, concentration, and market access: Evidence from the 19th-century American railroad expansion," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 157(C).
  2. Jeff Chan, 2020. "The Geography of Social Distancing in Canada: Evidence from Facebook," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 46(S1), pages 19-28, July.
  3. Jeff Chan, 2019. "The effect of college education on intolerance: evidence from Google search data," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(2), pages 83-86, January.
  4. Jeff Chan, 2019. "The Effect of Immigration on Local Public Finances," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 39(4), pages 2423-2428.
  5. Jeff Chan, 2019. "Tariffs and the Composition of Employment: Evidence from the Canada–US Free Trade Agreement," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 45(3), pages 342-365, September.
  6. Jeff Chan, 2019. "Labour market characteristics and surviving import shocks," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(5), pages 1288-1315, May.
  7. Jeff Chan, 2018. "Market access and occupational upgrading: evidence from the 19th century American transportation network," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(45), pages 4879-4900, September.
  8. Chan, Jeff, 2018. "Does import competition worsen the gender gap? Evidence from matched employer–employee data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 13-16.
  9. Jeff Chan, 2014. "The long-run impact of the power loom: evidence from 19th century Prussia," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(3), pages 1776-1791.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Jeff Chan, 2020. "The Geography of Social Distancing in Canada: Evidence from Facebook," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 46(S1), pages 19-28, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Bishoy Louis Zaki & Francesco Nicoli & Ellen Wayenberg & Bram Verschuere, 2022. "Contagious inequality: economic disparities and excess mortality during the COVID-19 pandemic [Excess all-cause mortality and COVID-19-related mortality: A temporal analysis in 22 countries, from J," Policy and Society, Oxford University Press, vol. 41(2), pages 199-216.
    2. Basu Parantap & Bell Clive & Edwards Terence Huw, 2022. "COVID Social Distancing and the Poor: An Analysis of the Evidence for England," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 22(1), pages 211-240, January.
    3. Anastasios Papanastasiou & Bradley J. Ruffle & Angela L. Zheng, 2020. "Compliance with Social Distancing: Theory and Empirical Evidence from Ontario during COVID-19," Working Papers 200004, Canadian Centre for Health Economics.
    4. Daniel Goetz, 2022. "Does providing free internet access to low‐income households affect COVID‐19 spread?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(12), pages 2648-2663, December.

  2. Jeff Chan, 2019. "The effect of college education on intolerance: evidence from Google search data," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(2), pages 83-86, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Nicholas Masafumi Watanabe & George B Cunningham, 2020. "The impact of race relations on NFL attendance: An econometric analysis," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(1), pages 1-21, January.
    2. Daria Denti & Alessandra Faggian, 2021. "Where do angry birds tweet? Income inequality and online hate in Italy," Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, Cambridge Political Economy Society, vol. 14(3), pages 483-506.
    3. Shen, Lucas, 2020. "Unexpected shocks to movement and job search: evidence from COVID-19 policies in Singapore using Google data," MPRA Paper 115430, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Rik Chakraborti & Gavin Roberts, 2020. "Anti-Gouging Laws, Shortages, and COVID-19: Insights from Consumer Searches," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 35(Winter 20), pages 1-20.

  3. Jeff Chan, 2019. "The Effect of Immigration on Local Public Finances," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 39(4), pages 2423-2428.

    Cited by:

    1. Poniatowicz Marzanna & Piekutowska Agnieszka, 2019. "The Fiscal Effects of Economic Immigration on Subnational Government Finance in Poland," Financial Internet Quarterly (formerly e-Finanse), Sciendo, vol. 15(1), pages 45-58, March.

  4. Jeff Chan, 2019. "Labour market characteristics and surviving import shocks," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(5), pages 1288-1315, May.

    Cited by:

    1. David Autor & David Dorn & Gordon H. Hanson, 2021. "On the Persistence of the China Shock," NBER Working Papers 29401, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Aghelmaleki, Hedieh & Bachmann, Ronald & Stiebale, Joel, 2019. "The China shock, employment protection, and European jobs," DICE Discussion Papers 328, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    3. Jianchun Fang & Giray Gozgor & Cheng Yan, 2021. "Does globalisation alleviate polarisation?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(4), pages 1031-1052, April.
    4. Angus C. Chu & Haichao Fan & Yuichi Furukawa & Zonglai Kou & Xueyue Liu, 2021. "Minimum Wages, Import Status, And Firms' Innovation: Theory And Evidence From China," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 59(1), pages 441-458, January.

  5. Chan, Jeff, 2018. "Does import competition worsen the gender gap? Evidence from matched employer–employee data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 13-16.

    Cited by:

    1. Grinza, Elena & Quatraro, Francesco, 2019. "Workers’ replacements and firms’ innovation dynamics: New evidence from Italian matched longitudinal data," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(9), pages 1-1.

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