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Ling Shen
(沈凌)

Personal Details

First Name:Ling
Middle Name:
Last Name:Shen
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psh168
http://vwlde.blog.sohu.com/
Terminal Degree:2006 Wirtschaftswissenschaftlicher Fachbereich; Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

School of Business
East China University of Science and Technology

Shanghai, China
http://bs.ecust.edu.cn/

021-64252303
021-6421324
Meilonglu street 130, campus box 114, Shanghai 2000237
RePEc:edi:ccecucn (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Shen, Ling, 2005. "Inequality and growth: A joint analysis of demand and supply," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Kiel 2005 30, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.

Articles

  1. Shen, Ling, 2012. "Are house prices too high in China?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 1206-1210.
  2. Marc Schiffbauer & Ling Shen, 2010. "Democracy vs. dictatorship," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 18(1), pages 59-90, January.
  3. Ling Shen, 2007. "When will a Dictator be Good?," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 31(2), pages 343-366, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

    Sorry, no citations of working papers recorded.

Articles

  1. Shen, Ling, 2012. "Are house prices too high in China?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 1206-1210.

    Cited by:

    1. Wen-Yuan Lin & I-Chun Tsai, 2016. "Asymmetric Fluctuating Behavior of China's Housing Prices," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 24(2), pages 107-126, March.
    2. Zhang, Dingsheng & Cheng, Wenli & Ng, Yew-Kwang, 2013. "Increasing returns, land use controls and housing prices in China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 789-795.
    3. Xu Zhang & Xiaoxing Liu & Jianqin Hang & Dengbao Yao & Guangping Shi, 2016. "Do Urban Rail Transit Facilities Affect Housing Prices? Evidence from China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(4), pages 1-14, April.
    4. Gregory C. Chow & Linlin Niu, 2015. "Housing Prices in Urban China as Determined by Demand and Supply," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(1), pages 1-16, February.
    5. Feng, Qu & Wu, Guiying Laura, 2015. "Bubble or riddle? An asset-pricing approach evaluation on China's housing market," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 376-383.
    6. Yongheng Deng & Eric Girardin & Roselyne Joyeux, 2015. "Fundamentals and the Volatility of Real Estate Prices in China: A Sequential Modelling Strategy," Working Papers 222015, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    7. Deng, Yongheng & Girardin, Eric & Joyeux, Roselyne, 2018. "Fundamentals and the volatility of real estate prices in China: A sequential modelling strategy," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 205-222.
    8. I-Chun Tsai & Shu-Hen Chiang, 2018. "Risk Transfer among Housing Markets in Major Cities in China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(7), pages 1-20, July.
    9. Yongsheng Jiang & Dong Zhao & Andrew Sanderford & Jing Du, 2018. "Effects of Bank Lending on Urban Housing Prices for Sustainable Development: A Panel Analysis of Chinese Cities," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(3), pages 1-16, February.
    10. Liang, Wenquan & Lu, Ming & Zhang, Hang, 2016. "Housing prices raise wages: Estimating the unexpected effects of land supply regulation in China," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 70-81.
    11. Wu, Jing & Gyourko, Joseph & Deng, Yongheng, 2016. "Evaluating the risk of Chinese housing markets: What we know and what we need to know," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 91-114.
    12. Chunhui Liu & Weixuan Song, 2019. "Perspectives of Socio-Spatial Differentiation from Soaring Housing Prices: A Case Study in Nanjing, China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(9), pages 1-16, May.
    13. Daisy J. Huang & Charles Ka Yui Leung & Baozhi Qu, 2015. "Do bank loans and local amenities explain Chinese urban house prices?," Globalization Institute Working Papers 230, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, revised 01 Mar 2015.
    14. Wang, Lei & Li, Shouwei & Wang, Jining & Meng, Yi, 2020. "Real estate bubbles in a bank-real estate loan network model integrating economic cycle and macro-prudential stress testing," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 542(C).
    15. Sun, Tianyu & Chand, Satish & Sharpe, Keiran, 2018. "Effect of Aging on Urban Land Prices in China," MPRA Paper 89237, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Li, Keyang & Qin, Yu & Wu, Jing, 2020. "Recent housing affordability in urban China: A comprehensive overview," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 59(C).

  2. Ling Shen, 2007. "When will a Dictator be Good?," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 31(2), pages 343-366, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Ramin Dadasov & Philipp Harms & Oliver Lorz, 2010. "Financial Integration in Autocracies: Greasing the Wheel or More to Steal?," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201014, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    2. Amegashie, J. Atsu, 2008. "Autocratic rule in ethnically-diverse societies," MPRA Paper 8933, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Anders Akerman & Anna Larsson & Alireza Naghavi, 2011. "Autocracies and Development in a Global Economy: A Tale of Two Elites," DEGIT Conference Papers c016_041, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    4. Schwuchow, Soeren, 2018. "Extractive Institutions, Choking Taxes, and War: On the (Beneficial) Impact of Inequality in Autocracies," Annual Conference 2018 (Freiburg, Breisgau): Digital Economy 181530, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    5. Mizuno, Nobuhiro & Naito, Katsuyuki & Okazawa, Ryosuke, 2012. "Inequality, extractive institutions, and growth in nondemocratic regimes," MPRA Paper 41434, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Mulligan, Casey B. & Tsui, Kevin K., 2015. "Political entry, public policies, and the economy," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 377-397.
    7. Kai Konrad & Wolfgang Leininger, 2011. "Self-enforcing norms and efficient non-cooperative collective action in the provision of public goods," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 146(3), pages 501-520, March.
    8. Alexander Libman, 2012. "Democracy, size of bureaucracy, and economic growth: evidence from Russian regions," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 1321-1352, December.
    9. Raouf Boucekkine & Paolo Piacquadio & Fabien Prieur, 2019. "A Lipsetian theory of voluntary power handover," Post-Print hal-02370531, HAL.
    10. Raouf Boucekkine & Rodolphe Desbordes & Paolo Melindi-Ghidi, 2019. "Particularism, dominant minorities and institutional change," AMSE Working Papers 1927, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France.
    11. Che, Jiahua & Chung, Kim-Sau & Qiao, Xue, 2013. "The good, the bad, and the civil society," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 68-76.
    12. Xiaowei Zang, 2010. "Why Are the Elite in China Motivated to Promote Growth?," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2010-084, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    13. Helios Herrera & César Martinelli, 2013. "Oligarchy, democracy, and state capacity," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 52(1), pages 165-186, January.
    14. Alessandro Riboni, 2013. "Ideology and endogenous constitutions," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 52(3), pages 885-913, April.
    15. Raouf Boucekkine & Paolo Giovanni Piacquadio & Fabien Prieur, 2016. "A Lipsetian Theory of Democratization: Development, Education, Inequality, and Resources," CESifo Working Paper Series 6283, CESifo.
    16. Dawei Che & Ling Shen, 2013. "The co-development of economies and institutions," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 21(2), pages 241-268, April.
    17. BORISSOV, Kirill & LAMBRECHT, Stéphane, 2009. "Growth and distribution in an AK-model with endogenous impatience," CORE Discussion Papers RP 2134, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    18. Marc Schiffbauer & Ling Shen, 2010. "Democracy vs. dictatorship," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 18(1), pages 59-90, January.
    19. Giacomo De Luca & Anastasia Litina & Petros G. Sekeris, 2012. "Growth-Friendly Dictatorships," Working Papers 1209, University of Namur, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2012.
    20. Jiancai Pi, 2008. "A Political Economy Pattern of China's History: On Revolution, Reform, and Involution under Dictatorship," Interdisciplinary Description of Complex Systems - scientific journal, Croatian Interdisciplinary Society Provider Homepage: http://indecs.eu, vol. 6(1), pages 21-27.
    21. Seim, Anna Larsson & Parente, Stephen L., 2013. "Democracy as a middle ground: A unified theory of development and political regimes," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 35-56.
    22. Zenthöfer, A.F., 2013. "Essays on development economics," Other publications TiSEM 356d10eb-9dfe-44c4-a270-6, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.

More information

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Statistics

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NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2006-08-05

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