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Peter Michael Bearse

Personal Details

First Name:Peter
Middle Name:Michael
Last Name:Bearse
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbe67
http://www.uncg.edu/bae/people/bearse/
Peter Bearse, Department of Economics 462 Bryan School of Business and Economics University of North Carolina at Greensboro Greensboro, NC 27402-6165
+1-336-334-4871
Terminal Degree:1995 Department of Economics; University of Virginia (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Economics Department
Bryan School of Business and Economics
University of North Carolina-Greensboro

Greensboro, North Carolina (United States)
http://www.uncg.edu/bae/econ/

(336) 334-5463
(336) 334-4089
Box 26165, Greensboro, NC 27402-6165
RePEc:edi:edncgus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Bearse, P. & Glomm, G. & Ravikumar, B., 1999. "On the Political Economy of Means-Tested Education Vouchers," Papers 9904, Michigan State - Econometrics and Economic Theory.
  2. Bearse, P. & Glomm, G. & Jeneba, E., 1999. "Composition of Government Budget, Non-Single Peakedness and Majority Voting," Papers 9903, Michigan State - Econometrics and Economic Theory.

Articles

  1. Bearse, Peter M & Bozdogan, Hamparsum & Schlottmann, Alan M, 1997. "Empirical Econometric Modelling of Food Consumption Using a New Informational Complexity Approach," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(5), pages 563-586, Sept.-Oct.
  2. Bearse, Peter M & Bozdogan, Hamparsum & Schlottmann, Alan M, 1997. "Empirical Econometric Modelling of Food Consumption Using a New Informational Complexity Approach: Reply," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(5), pages 590-592, Sept.-Oct.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Bearse, P. & Glomm, G. & Ravikumar, B., 1999. "On the Political Economy of Means-Tested Education Vouchers," Papers 9904, Michigan State - Econometrics and Economic Theory.

    Cited by:

    1. Buly A Cardak, 2004. "Education Vouchers, Growth and Income Inequality," Working Papers 2004.03, School of Economics, La Trobe University.
    2. Dan Anderberg, 2007. "Inefficient households and the mix of government spending," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 131(1), pages 127-140, April.
    3. Peter Bearse & Buly A. Cardak & Gerhard Glomm & B. Ravikumar, 2009. "Why do Education Vouchers Fail?," CAEPR Working Papers 2009-014, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Department of Economics, Indiana University Bloomington.
    4. Gradstein, Mark & Justman, Moshe, 2005. "The melting pot and school choice," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(5-6), pages 871-896, June.
    5. Peter Bearse & Buly A. Cardak & Gerhard Glomm & B. Ravikumar, 2011. "Why do education vouchers fail at the ballot box?," Working Papers 2011-032, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    6. Mehmet S. Tosun, 2016. "Demographic Changes and Fiscal Policy in MENA Countries," Working Papers 1023, Economic Research Forum, revised Jul 2016.
    7. John Creedy, 2006. "Education Vouchers: Means Testing Versus Uniformity," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 978, The University of Melbourne.
    8. Mehmet S Tosun, 2005. "Global Aging and Fiscal Policy with International Labor Mobility; A Political Economy Perspective," IMF Working Papers 05/140, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Pablo González & Alejandra Mizala & Pilar Romaguera, 2002. "Recursos diferenciados a la educación subvencionada en Chile," Documentos de Trabajo 150, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
    10. Buly A Cardak & Phillip Hone, 2003. "Government Subsidies for Private Community Services: The Case of School Education," Working Papers 2003.01, School of Economics, La Trobe University.
    11. Cohen-Zada, Danny & Justman, Moshe, 2005. "The religious factor in private education," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 391-418, May.
    12. Mehmet Serkan Tosun, 2004. "Population Aging, Labor Mobility, and Economic Growth: Evidence From MENA and the Developed World," Working Papers 0417, Economic Research Forum, revised 08 May 2004.
    13. Steve Bradley & Jim Taylor, 2010. "Diversity, Choice and the Quasi‐market: An Empirical Analysis of Secondary Education Policy in England," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(1), pages 1-26, February.
    14. Julie Berry Cullen & Steven G. Rivkin, 2003. "The Role of Special Education in School Choice," NBER Chapters, in: The Economics of School Choice, pages 67-106, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Leonid Azarnert, 2006. "Free Education: For Whom, Where and When?," DEGIT Conference Papers c011_024, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    16. Tosun, Mehmet Serkan, 2008. "Endogenous fiscal policy and capital market transmissions in the presence of demographic shocks," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 2031-2060, June.
    17. Nechyba, Thomas J., 2002. "Introducing School Choice into Multi-District Public School Systems," Working Papers 02-13, Duke University, Department of Economics.
    18. Buly Cardak & Phillip Hone, 2003. "Subsidies for Private Community Services: The Case of School Education," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 10(2), pages 129-144.
    19. Alexander Kemnitz & Robert K. von Weizsäcker, 2003. "Bildungsreform in der Demokratie," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 72(2), pages 188-204.
    20. Carolina Ostoic & Alejandra Mizala & Pilar Romaguera, 2004. "Equity and Achievement in the Chilean School Choice Experience," Econometric Society 2004 Latin American Meetings 232, Econometric Society.
    21. Nechyba, Thomas J., 2003. "What Can Be (And What Has Been) Learned From General Equilibrium Simulation Models of School Finance?," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 56(2), pages 387-414, June.
    22. Leonid Azarnert, 2010. "Free education, fertility and human capital accumulation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(2), pages 449-468, March.
    23. Gradstein, Mark & Justman, Moshe, 2001. "Public Education and the Melting Pot," CEPR Discussion Papers 2924, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    24. Tosun, Mehmet S. & Williamson, Claudia R. & Yakovlev, Pavel, 2009. "Population Aging, Elderly Migration and Education Spending: Intergenerational Conflict Revisited," IZA Discussion Papers 4161, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    25. Anderberg, Dan, 2013. "Post-compulsory education: Participation and politics," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 134-150.

  2. Bearse, P. & Glomm, G. & Jeneba, E., 1999. "Composition of Government Budget, Non-Single Peakedness and Majority Voting," Papers 9903, Michigan State - Econometrics and Economic Theory.

    Cited by:

    1. Bearse, P. & Glomm, G. & Janeba, E., 2000. "Why poor countries rely mostly on redistribution in-kind," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 463-481, March.
    2. Robert Schwager, 2018. "Majority Vote on Educational Standards," CESifo Working Paper Series 6845, CESifo.
    3. Tetsuo Ono & Yuki Uchida, 2014. "Pensions, Education, and Growth: A Positive Analysis," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 14-37, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics.
    4. Tetsuo Ono, 2015. "Public education and social security: a political economy approach," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 1-25, February.
    5. Tetsuo Ono, 2014. "Economic Growth and the Politics of Intergenerational Redistribution," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 14-17-Rev., Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics, revised Sep 2015.
    6. Creedy, John & Moslehi, Solmaz, 2009. "Modelling the composition of government expenditure in democracies," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 42-55, March.
    7. Levy, Gilat, 2005. "The politics of public provision of education," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 940, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    8. Levy, Gilat, 2004. "Public education for the minority, private education for the majority," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 3617, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    9. Romero J. Gabriel, 2012. "Determining Public Provision of Education Services in a Sequential Education Process," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-42, December.
    10. John Creedy & Shuyun May Li & Solmaz Moslehi, 2009. "The Composition of Government Expenditure in an Overlapping Generations Model," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1064, The University of Melbourne.
    11. John Creedy & Solmaz Moslehi, 2014. "The composition of government expenditure with alternative choicemechanisms," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(1), pages 53-71, April.
    12. Tetsuo Ono, 2013. "Inequality and the Politics of Redistribution," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 12-09-Rev.2, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics, revised Sep 2014.
    13. John Creedy & Solmaz Moslehi, 2008. "Voting over Taxes and Expenditure: The Role of Home Production," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1052, The University of Melbourne.
    14. Tetsuo Ono, 2012. "Inequality Dynamics and the Politics of Redistribution," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 12-09-Rev, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics, revised Nov 2013.

Articles

  1. Bearse, Peter M & Bozdogan, Hamparsum & Schlottmann, Alan M, 1997. "Empirical Econometric Modelling of Food Consumption Using a New Informational Complexity Approach," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(5), pages 563-586, Sept.-Oct.

    Cited by:

    1. Ville Aalto-Setälä & Jouko Kinnunen & Katri Koistinen, 2004. "Reasons for high food prices in small market areas: The case of the Åland Islands," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(1), pages 17-29.
    2. Bozdogan, Hamparsum & Haughton, Dominique M. A., 1998. "Informational complexity criteria for regression models," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 51-76, July.
    3. Jaromir Antoch & Jan Hanousek, 2001. "Model Selection and Simplification Using Lattices," Econometrics 0012004, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Damjan Pfajfar & Emiliano Santoro, 2007. "Heterogeneity, Asymmetries and Learning in InfIation Expectation Formation: An Empirical Assessment," Money Macro and Finance (MMF) Research Group Conference 2006 123, Money Macro and Finance Research Group.
    5. Helper, Susan & Levine, David I. & Bendoly, Elliott, 2000. "Employee Involvement and Pay at U.S. and Canadian Auto Suppliers," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt8t51741b, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
    6. Farshid Vahid, 2000. "Clustering Regression Functions in a Panel," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0251, Econometric Society.

  2. Bearse, Peter M & Bozdogan, Hamparsum & Schlottmann, Alan M, 1997. "Empirical Econometric Modelling of Food Consumption Using a New Informational Complexity Approach: Reply," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(5), pages 590-592, Sept.-Oct.

    Cited by:

    1. Bozdogan, Hamparsum & Haughton, Dominique M. A., 1998. "Informational complexity criteria for regression models," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 51-76, July.
    2. Damjan Pfajfar & Emiliano Santoro, 2007. "Heterogeneity, Asymmetries and Learning in InfIation Expectation Formation: An Empirical Assessment," Money Macro and Finance (MMF) Research Group Conference 2006 123, Money Macro and Finance Research Group.

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