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Extent And Growth Effects Of Informality In Turkey: Evidence From A Firm-Level Survey

Author

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  • KEREM CANTEKIN

    (Department of Economics, University of Utah, 260 S. Central Campus Drive, Orson Spencer Hall, RM 343, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-9150, USA)

  • CEYHUN ELGIN

    () (Department of Economics, Bogazici University, Natuk Birkan Building, 34342 Bebek, Istanbul, Turkey)

Abstract

In this paper, we provide a measure for both the prevalence and growth effects of informality in Turkey using firm-level data from the Turkish Economy. The survey is conducted in April–May 2013 covering 1000 representative firms interviewing owners/head managers of the firms. Based on the information given by these owners and managers, the survey makes a complete characterization of several firm characteristics, provides complete information on the extent of informality as well as its effects on various economic outcomes of these firms. The cross-sectional econometric analysis we conduct using the survey data shows that there is an inverted-U relationship between a specific measure of informality and growth expectations of firms. These results shed light on our understanding of the specific channels through which informality affects firms’ growth not only in Turkey but in other emerging markets as well.

Suggested Citation

  • Kerem Cantekin & Ceyhun Elgin, 2017. "Extent And Growth Effects Of Informality In Turkey: Evidence From A Firm-Level Survey," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 62(05), pages 1017-1037, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:wsi:serxxx:v:62:y:2017:i:05:n:s0217590815500794
    DOI: 10.1142/S0217590815500794
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ceyhun Elgin & Muhammed Burak Sezgin, 2017. "Sectoral Estimates of Informality: A New Method and Application for the Turkish Economy," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 55(4), pages 261-289, December.
    2. Ceyhun Elgin, 2020. "Shadow Economies Around the World: Evidence from Metropolitan Areas," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 46(2), pages 301-322, April.
    3. Tugba Somuncu & Christopher Hannum, 2018. "The Rebound Effect of Energy Efficiency Policy in the Presence of Energy Theft," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(12), pages 1-28, December.

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    Keywords

    Informality; growth; survey data;

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