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Sectoral Estimates of Informality: A New Method and Application for the Turkish Economy

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  • Ceyhun Elgin
  • Muhammed Burak Sezgin

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  • Ceyhun Elgin & Muhammed Burak Sezgin, 2017. "Sectoral Estimates of Informality: A New Method and Application for the Turkish Economy," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 55(4), pages 261-289, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:deveco:v:55:y:2017:i:4:p:261-289
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    28. Fatih Savasan & Friedrich G. Schneider, 2006. "What determines informal hiring? Evidence from the Turkish textile sector," Economics working papers 2006-04, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tanthaka Vivatsurakit & Jessica Vechbanyongratana, 2020. "Returns to education among the informally employed in Thailand," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 34(1), pages 26-43, May.
    2. Ceyhun Elgin, 2020. "Shadow Economies Around the World: Evidence from Metropolitan Areas," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 46(2), pages 301-322, April.
    3. Reyhan Atasü-Topcuoğlu, 2019. "Syrian Refugee Entrepreneurship in Turkey: Integration and the Use of Immigrant Capital in the Informal Economy," Social Inclusion, Cogitatio Press, vol. 7(4), pages 200-210.
    4. Ceyhun Elgin & Ferda Erturk, 2019. "Informal economies around the world: measures, determinants and consequences," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 9(2), pages 221-237, June.

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