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Survey evidence on price-setting patterns of Romanian firms

  • Mihai Copaciu

    (National Bank of Romania, Monetary Policy and Modeling Department, Bucharest, Romania)

  • Florian Neagu

    (National Bank of Romania, Financial Stability Department, Bucharest, Romania)

  • Horia Braun-Erdei

    (ING Investment Management, Romania)

This paper presents for Romanian firms the results of the first survey on price-setting patterns among the New Member States of the EU. Diverging from Inflation Persistence Network (IPN) findings, generally small firms perceive higher competitive pressure and adopt the market price, using a state-dependent rule, while lower perceived competition is consistent with medium and large firms using mark-up pricing. Prices are reviewed and changed more often than for EMU firms and are more flexible than wages. Similar to IPN evidence, contracts are the main sources of price stickiness. The survey suggests full price transmission of large unanticipated financial shocks. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/mde.1484
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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Managerial and Decision Economics.

Volume (Year): 31 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2-3 ()
Pages: 235-247

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Handle: RePEc:wly:mgtdec:v:31:y:2010:i:2-3:p:235-247
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/7976

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  1. Laurence Ball & N. Gregory Mankiw, 1994. "A sticky-price manifesto," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Apr.
  2. Kashyap, Anil K, 1995. "Sticky Prices: New Evidence from Retail Catalogs," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(1), pages 245-74, February.
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  7. Kwapil, Claudia & Baumgartner, Josef & Scharler, Johann, 2005. "The price-setting behavior of Austrian firms: some survey evidence," Working Paper Series 0464, European Central Bank.
  8. Simon Hall & Mark Walsh & Anthony Yates, 1997. "How do UK companies set prices?," Bank of England working papers 67, Bank of England.
  9. Daniel Levy & Mark Bergen & Shantanu Dutta & Robert Venable, 2005. "The Magnitude of Menu Costs: Direct Evidence from Large U.S. Supermarket Chains," Macroeconomics 0505012, EconWPA.
  10. Smets, Frank, 2003. "Maintaining price stability: how long is the medium term?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(6), pages 1293-1309, September.
  11. Apel, Mikael & Friberg, Richard & Hallsten, Kerstin, 2001. "Micro Foundations of Macroeconomic Price Adjustment: Survey Evidence from Swedish Firms," Working Paper Series 128, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
  12. Coricelli, Fabrizio & Horváth, Roman, 2006. "Price Setting Behaviour: Micro Evidence on Slovakia," CEPR Discussion Papers 5445, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  13. John B. Taylor, 1998. "Staggered Price and Wage Setting in Macroeconomics," NBER Working Papers 6754, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Rotemberg, Julio J., 2005. "Customer anger at price increases, changes in the frequency of price adjustment and monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(4), pages 829-852, May.
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