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Family planning and fertility decline in rural Iran: the impact of rural health clinics

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  • Djavad Salehi‐Isfahani
  • M. Jalal Abbasi‐Shavazi
  • Meimanat Hosseini‐Chavoshi

Abstract

During the first few years of the Islamic Revolution of 1979, and aided by pro-natal government policies, Iranian fertility was on the rise. In a reversal of its population policy, in 1989, the government launched an ambitious and innovative family planning program aimed at rural families. By 2005, the program had covered more than 90% of the rural population and the average number of births per rural woman had declined to replacement level from about 8 births in the mid 1980s. In this paper, we evaluate the impact of a particular feature of the program – health houses – on rural fertility, taking advantage of the variation in the timing of their construction across the country. We use three different methods to obtain a range of estimates for the impact of health houses on village‐level fertility: difference‐in‐differences (DID), matching DID, and length of exposure. We find estimates of impact ranging from 4 to 20% of the decline in fertility during 1986–1996. Copyright (C) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Djavad Salehi‐Isfahani & M. Jalal Abbasi‐Shavazi & Meimanat Hosseini‐Chavoshi, 2010. "Family planning and fertility decline in rural Iran: the impact of rural health clinics," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(S1), pages 159-180, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:19:y:2010:i:s1:p:159-180
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1613
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Angeles, Gustavo & Guilkey, David K & Mroz, Thomas A, 2005. "The Effects of Education and Family Planning Programs on Fertility in Indonesia," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 54(1), pages 165-201, October.
    2. A. Smith, Jeffrey & E. Todd, Petra, 2005. "Does matching overcome LaLonde's critique of nonexperimental estimators?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 125(1-2), pages 305-353.
    3. Gustavo Angeles & David Guilkey & Thomas Mroz, 2005. "The determinants of fertility in rural Peru: Program effects in the early years of the national family planning program," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(2), pages 367-389, June.
    4. Lucia Breierova & Esther Duflo, 2003. "The Impact of Education on Fertility and Child Mortality: Do Fathers Really Matter Less Than Mothers?," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 217, OECD Publishing.
    5. Wagstaff, Adam & Lindelow, Magnus & Jun, Gao & Ling, Xu & Juncheng, Qian, 2009. "Extending health insurance to the rural population: An impact evaluation of China's new cooperative medical scheme," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 1-19, January.
    6. James J. Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Petra E. Todd, 1997. "Matching As An Econometric Evaluation Estimator: Evidence from Evaluating a Job Training Programme," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(4), pages 605-654.
    7. Esther Duflo, 2000. "Child Health and Household Resources in South Africa: Evidence from the Old Age Pension Program," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 393-398, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Djavad Salehi-Isfahani & Nadia Belhaj Hassine, 2012. "Equality of Opportunity in Education in the Middle East and North Africa," Working Papers e07-33, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Economics.
    2. Djavad Salehi-Isfahani & Nadia Hassine & Ragui Assaad, 2014. "Equality of opportunity in educational achievement in the Middle East and North Africa," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 12(4), pages 489-515, December.
    3. Social Policy and Population Section, Social Development Division, ESCAP., 2015. "Asia-Pacific Population Journal Volume 30, No. 1," Asia-Pacific Population Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 30(1), pages 1-130, June.
    4. Martha J. Bailey, 2013. "Fifty Years of Family Planning: New Evidence on the Long-Run Effects of Increasing Access to Contraception," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 44(1 (Spring), pages 341-409.
    5. Djavad Salehi-Isfahani & Sara Taghvatalab, 2017. "Education and the Allocation of Time of Married Women in Iran," Working Papers 1114, Economic Research Forum, revised 06 2003.
    6. Mahdi Majbouri, 2016. "Twins, Family Size, and Female Labor Force Participation in Iran," Working Papers 1046, Economic Research Forum, revised 09 Jan 2016.
    7. Ali Hashemi & Djavad Salehi-Isfahani, 2013. "From Health Service Delivery to Family Planning: The Changing Impact of Health Clinics on Fertility in Rural Iran," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 61(2), pages 281-309.
    8. Mohammad Jalal Abbasi-Shavazi & Abbas Askari Nodoushan & Arland Thornton, 2012. "Family life and developmental idealism in Yazd, Iran," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 26(10), pages 207-238, March.

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