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Twins, Family Size, and Female Labor Force Participation in Iran

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  • Majbouri, Mahdi

    () (Babson College)

Abstract

Despite the remarkable increase in women's education levels and the rapid fall of their fertility rate in Iran, female labor force participation (FLFP) has remained low. Using the instrumental variable method, this paper estimates the causal impact of number of children on mothers' participation in the labor market. It finds that having an extra (unplanned) child would only reduce female participation rate for low educated mothers and mothers with young children, thus having no causal impact on most mothers' participation. This result explains why the rapid decline in fertility rates did not increase female participation; rather, other factors should be at play. It hence moves us a step forward in explaining the puzzle of female labor force participation in Iran. Policy implications are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Majbouri, Mahdi, 2018. "Twins, Family Size, and Female Labor Force Participation in Iran," IZA Discussion Papers 11638, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11638
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1980. "Life-Cycle Labor Supply and Fertility: Causal Inferences from Household Models," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(2), pages 328-348, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:taf:femeco:v:22:y:2016:i:4:p:31-53 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Sanaz Fesharaki & Mahdi Majbouri, 2016. "Iran's multi-ethnic mosaic," WIDER Working Paper Series 117, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    female labor force participation; fertility; Iran; twins; instrumental variable;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

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