IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/oxecpp/v63y2011i2p211-231.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Fertility and parents' labour supply: new evidence from US census data

Author

Listed:
  • James P. Vere

Abstract

This article uses US Census data from 1980, 1990, and 2000 to estimate synthetic-cohort life cycle effects of fertility on women's and couples' labour supply. Multiple births are used as an instrument to control for unobserved heterogeneity. For single women, the causal effect of fertility has declined significantly over time. Couples, however, have become more specialized along traditional lines, with married men tending to increase labour earnings rather than reduce hours worked. Copyright 2011 Oxford University Press 2011 All rights reserved, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • James P. Vere, 2011. "Fertility and parents' labour supply: new evidence from US census data," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 63(2), pages 211-231, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:63:y:2011:i:2:p:211-231
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oep/gpr003
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Anna Baranowska, 2013. "The family size effects on female employment. Evidence from the “natural experiments” related to human reproduction," Working Papers 57, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    2. Sylvia Frühwirth-Schnatter & Martin Halla & Alexandra Posekany & Gerald J. Pruckner & Thomas Schober, 2014. "The Quantity and Quality of Children: A Semi-Parametric Bayesian IV Approach," Economics working papers 2014-03, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    3. Karbownik, Krzysztof & Myck, Michal, 2012. "For Some Mothers More Than Others: How Children Matter for Labour Market Outcomes When Both Fertility and Female Employment Are Low," IZA Discussion Papers 6933, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Wolfgang Frimmel & Martin Halla & Bernhard Schmidpeter & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2017. "Grandmothers' Labor Supply," Economics working papers 2017-20, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    5. Julie Moschion, 2013. "The Impact of Fertility on Mothers' Labour Supply in Australia: Evidence from Exogenous Variation in Family Size," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 89(286), pages 319-338, September.
    6. Griffen, Andrew S. & Nakamuro, Makiko & Inui, Tomohiko, 2015. "Fertility and maternal labor supply in Japan: Conflicting policy goals?," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 52-72.
    7. Halla, Martin & Zweimüller, Martina, 2014. "Parental Response to Early Human Capital Shocks: Evidence from the Chernobyl Accident," IZA Discussion Papers 7968, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Krzysztof Karbownik & Michał Myck, 2016. "For some mothers more than others," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 24(4), pages 705-725, October.
    9. Angelov, Nikolay & Karimi, Arizo, 2012. "Mothers’ Income Recovery after Childbearing," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2012:19, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    10. Anna Baranowska-Rataj & Anna Matysiak, 2016. "The Causal Effects of the Number of Children on Female Employment - Do European Institutional and Gender Conditions Matter?," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 343-367, September.
    11. repec:aea:aecrev:v:107:y:2017:i:6:p:1611-37 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Lundborg, Petter & Plug, Erik & Würtz Rasmussen, Astrid, 2018. "Can Women Have Children and a Career? IV Evidence from IVF Treatments," Working Paper Series 2018:2, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    13. Griffen, Andrew S. & Nakamuro, Makiko & Inui, Tomohiko, 2015. "Fertility and maternal labor supply in Japan: Conflicting policy goals?," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 52-72.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:63:y:2011:i:2:p:211-231. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: https://academic.oup.com/oep .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.