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She Cares and He Earns? The Family Gaps in Poland

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  • Ewa Cukrowska-Torzewska

    (Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw)

Abstract

This paper deals with parenthood induced inequalities in the labour market outcomes of men and women in Poland. It extends the existing framework of research by providing a joint analysis of parenthood impact on working hours and wages for men and women for a transition economy. Using propensity score matching and fixed effects estimation this paper reveals that parenthood is associated with longer working hours and greater wages for men and shorter working hours and lower wages for women. The gaps in working hours may be however partially attributed to unobserved differences between parents and childless individuals. For men, unobserved heterogeneity also explains their greater wages. Mothers are however found to receive significantly lower wages even if their unobserved characteristics and self-selection into employment are accounted.

Suggested Citation

  • Ewa Cukrowska-Torzewska, 2015. "She Cares and He Earns? The Family Gaps in Poland," Working Papers 2015-32, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
  • Handle: RePEc:war:wpaper:2015-32
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ewa Cukrowska-Torzewska, 2016. "Comparative analysis of the motherhood gap in employment and wages: the role of family policies and their interaction," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 1601, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies.
    2. Agnes Szabo-Morvai & Anna Lovasz, 2017. "Childcare and Maternal Labor Supply – a Cross-Country Analysis of Quasi-Experimental Estimates from 7 Countries," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 1703, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies.
    3. Witkowska Dorota, 2018. "Does the Household Structure Influence Remuneration in Poland?," Econometrics. Advances in Applied Data Analysis, Sciendo, vol. 22(4), pages 24-42, December.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    family gap; wage inequality; fatherhood premium; motherhood penalty; specialization;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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