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Providing care for an elderly parent: interactions among siblings?

Author

Listed:
  • Roméo Fontaine

    (LEDa-LEGOS, Université Paris-Dauphine, Paris, France)

  • Agnès Gramain

    (BETA, UMR CNRS, Université de Nancy II, Nancy, France)

  • Jérôme Wittwer

    (LEDa-LEGOS, Université Paris-Dauphine, Paris, France)

Abstract

This article is focused on children providing and financing long-term care for their elderly parent. The aim of this work is to highlight the interactions that may take place among siblings when deciding whether or not to become a caregiver. We look at families with two children using data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe; our sample contains 314 dependent elderly and their 628 adult children. In order to identify the interactions between siblings, we have specified a two-person discrete game model. To estimate this model, without invoking the 'coherency' condition, we have added an endogenous selection rule to solve the incompleteness problem arising from multiplicity or absence of equilibrium. Our empirical results suggest that the three classical effects identified by Manski could potentially explain the observed correlation between the siblings' caregiving behaviour. Correlated effects alone appear to be weak. Contextual interactions and endogenous interactions reveal cross-effects. The asymmetric character of the endogenous interactions is our most striking result. The younger child's involvement appears to increase the net benefit of caregiving for the elder one, whereas the elder child's involvement decreases the net benefit of caregiving for the younger child. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Roméo Fontaine & Agnès Gramain & Jérôme Wittwer, 2009. "Providing care for an elderly parent: interactions among siblings?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(9), pages 1011-1029.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:18:y:2009:i:9:p:1011-1029
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.1533
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1533
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Michelle Sovinsky & Steven Stern, 2016. "Dynamic modelling of long-term care decisions," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 463-488, June.
    2. Meliyanni Johar & Shiko Maruyama, 2012. "Externality and Strategic Interaction in the Location Choice of Siblings under Altruism toward Parents," Working Papers 201201, ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR), Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales.
    3. Michelle Goeree & Bridget Hiedemann & Steven Stern, 2011. "Will You Still Want Me Tomorrow? The Dynamics of Families' Long-Term Care Arrangements," Working Papers 2011-035, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    4. Steven Stern, 2014. "O Brother, Where Art Thou? We Need Your Help," Department of Economics Working Papers 14-08, Stony Brook University, Department of Economics.
    5. David C. Grabowski & Edward C. Norton & Courtney H. Van Houtven, 2012. "Informal Care," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Health Economics, Second Edition, chapter 30 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Meliyanni Johar & Shiko Maruyama, 2011. "Intergenerational cohabitation in modern Indonesia: filial support and dependence," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(S1), pages 87-104, September.
    7. Quitterie Roquebert & Roméo Fontaine & Agnès Gramain, 2016. "L'aide à un parent âgé, seul et dépendant : déterminants structurels et interactions," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01316903, HAL.
    8. repec:hal:journl:halshs-01316903 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Kiumars Zarafshani & Lida Sharafi & Hossein Azadi & Steven Van Passel, 2016. "Vulnerability Assessment Models to Drought: Toward a Conceptual Framework," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(6), pages 1-21, June.
    10. Oliveira, Jaqueline, 2016. "The value of children: Inter-generational support, fertility, and human capital," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 1-16.
    11. Mizuki Komura & Hikaru Ogawa, 2017. "The prodigal son: does the younger brother always care for his parentsin old age?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(22), pages 2153-2165, May.
    12. Stéphane Mechoulan & François-Charles Wolff, 2015. "Intra-household allocation of family resources and birth order: evidence from France using siblings data," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 937-964, October.
    13. repec:eee:hapoch:v1_951 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. repec:dau:papers:123456789/9523 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Quitterie Roquebert & Roméo Fontaine & Agnès Gramain, 2016. "L'aide à un parent âgé, seul et dépendant : déterminants structurels et interactions," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 16030, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    16. Francisca M. Antman, 2012. "Elderly Care and Intrafamily Resource Allocation when Children Migrate," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 47(2), pages 331-363.
    17. repec:wly:quante:v:8:y:2017:i:1:p:277-316 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Shiko Maruyama & Meliyanni Johar, 2017. "Do siblings free‐ride in “being there” for parents?," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 8(1), pages 277-316, March.
    19. Martin, Cécile, 2014. "Concurrence, prix et qualité de la prise en charge en EHPAD en France : Analyses micro-économétriques," Economics Thesis from University Paris Dauphine, Paris Dauphine University, number 123456789/13712 edited by Dormont, Brigitte.
    20. Michio Yuda & Jinkook Lee, 2016. "Effects of Informal Caregivers' Health on Care Recipients," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 67(2), pages 192-210, June.

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