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Strategic Play Among Family Members When Making Long-Term Care Decisions

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  • Steven Stern
  • Bridget Hiedemann

Abstract

This paper describes a strategic model of bargaining within a family to determine how to care for an elderly parent. We estimate the parameters of the model using data from the National Long-Term Care Survey. We find that the parameter estimates generally make sense and that the model is consistent with the data. The results have strong implications for using less structural empirical models for policy analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Steven Stern & Bridget Hiedemann, 1999. "Strategic Play Among Family Members When Making Long-Term Care Decisions," Virginia Economics Online Papers 321, University of Virginia, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:vir:virpap:321
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    File URL: http://repec.as.virginia.edu/RePEc/vir/virpap/papers/virpap321.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Steven Stern, 1995. "Estimating Family Long-Term Care Decisions in the Presence of Endogenous Child Characteristics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(3), pages 551-580.
    2. Hoerger, Thomas J & Picone, Gabriel A & Sloan, Frank A, 1996. "Public Subsidies, Private Provision of Care and Living Arrangements of the Elderly," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(3), pages 428-440, August.
    3. Axel Borsch-Supan & Laurence J. Kotlikoff & John N. Morris, 1988. "The Dynamics of Living Arrangements of the Elderly," NBER Working Papers 2787, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Stern, Steven, 1994. "Two Dynamic Discrete Choice Estimation Problems and Simulation Method Solutions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(4), pages 695-702, November.
    5. Maxim Engers & Steven Stern, 2002. "Long-Term Care and Family Bargaining," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 43(1), pages 73-114, February.
    6. Sloan, Frank A & Picone, Gabriel & Hoerger, Thomas J, 1997. "The Supply of Children's Time to Disabled Elderly Parents," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(2), pages 295-308, April.
    7. Bernheim, B Douglas & Shleifer, Andrei & Summers, Lawrence H, 1986. "The Strategic Bequest Motive," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(3), pages 151-182, July.
    8. David M. Cutler & Louise Sheiner, 1994. "Policy Options for Long-Term Care," NBER Chapters, in: Studies in the Economics of Aging, pages 395-442, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Douglas Wolf & Beth Soldo, 1988. "Household composition choices of older unmarried women," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 25(3), pages 387-403, August.
    10. Laurence J. Kotlikoff & John N. Morris, 1990. "Why Don't the Elderly Live with Their Children? A New Look," NBER Chapters, in: Issues in the Economics of Aging, pages 149-172, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Browning, Martin & Francois Bourguignon & Pierre-Andre Chiappori & Valerie Lechene, 1994. "Income and Outcomes: A Structural Model of Intrahousehold Allocation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(6), pages 1067-1096, December.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Long-Term Care; Family Bargaining; Structural Estimation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • C78 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Bargaining Theory; Matching Theory
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination

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