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Shared Caregiving Responsibilities of Adult Siblings with Elderly Parents

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  • Tennille J. Checkovich
  • Steven Stern

Abstract

This paper uses a nonstructural, ordered discrete choice model to measure the effects of various parent and child characteristics upon the independent caregiving decisions of the adult children of elderly parents sampled in the 1982 and 1984 National Long Term Care Survey (NLTCS). While significant effects are noted, emphasis is placed on test statistics constructed to measure the independence of caregiving decisions. The test statistic results are conclusive: The caregiving decisions of adult children are dependent across time and family members. Structural models taking dependencies among family members into account note effects similar to those in the nonstructural model.

Suggested Citation

  • Tennille J. Checkovich & Steven Stern, 2002. "Shared Caregiving Responsibilities of Adult Siblings with Elderly Parents," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(3), pages 441-478.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:37:y:2002:i:3:p:441-478
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    1. Steven Stern, 1995. "Estimating Family Long-Term Care Decisions in the Presence of Endogenous Child Characteristics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(3), pages 551-580.
    2. Stern, Steven, 1994. "Two Dynamic Discrete Choice Estimation Problems and Simulation Method Solutions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(4), pages 695-702, November.
    3. Hiedemann, Bridget & Stern, Steven, 1999. "Strategic play among family members when making long-term care decisions," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 29-57, September.
    4. Maxim Engers & Steven Stern, 2002. "Long-Term Care and Family Bargaining," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 43(1), pages 73-114, February.
    5. Steven Stern, 1996. "Measuring Child Work and Residence Adjustments to Parents'Long-Term Care Needs," Virginia Economics Online Papers 386, University of Virginia, Department of Economics.
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