IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/wly/hlthec/v11y2002i8p695-708.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

A theoretical model of adolescent suicide and some evidence from US data

Author

Listed:
  • Vijay K. Mathur

    (Department of Economics, Cleveland State University, USA)

  • Donald G. Freeman

    (Department of Economics and International Business, Sam Houston State University, Texas, USA)

Abstract

Suicide rates for adolescents have doubled since 1970 and tripled since 1960, even as rates for other age groups have declined. Using a Becker-type model of household production and consumption, we demonstrate conditions under which utility maximizing parents allocate time away from time-intensive commodities like children's well-being, and towards market work and less time-intensive consumption commodities. This reallocation of time towards market work has mixed effects on children' mental health: higher money income tends to improve family and children's well-being, but the loss of parental time has an opposite effect on children's mental health and increases the risk of adolescent suicide. Empirical evidence using state panel regressions of adolescent suicide rates on economic, social and demographic variables is consistent with predictions based on our model; our results indicate that the favorable effect of higher incomes has more than offset the negative effect of lost parental time. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Vijay K. Mathur & Donald G. Freeman, 2002. "A theoretical model of adolescent suicide and some evidence from US data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(8), pages 695-708.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:11:y:2002:i:8:p:695-708
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.704
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.704
    File Function: Link to full text; subscription required
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David S. Salkever, 1982. "Children's Health Problems: Implications for Parental Labor Supply and Earnings," NBER Chapters,in: Economic Aspects of Health, pages 221-252 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Browning, Martin, 1992. "Children and Household Economic Behavior," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 1434-1475, September.
    3. Dennis Ahlburg & Morton Schapiro, 1984. "Socioeconomic ramifications of changing cohort size: an analysis of U.S. postwar suicide rates by age and sex," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 21(1), pages 97-108, February.
    4. Hamermesh, Daniel S & Soss, Neal M, 1974. "An Economic Theory of Suicide," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 83-98, Jan.-Feb..
    5. Folbre, Nancy, 1994. "Children as Public Goods," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 86-90, May.
    6. Stigler, George J & Becker, Gary S, 1977. "De Gustibus Non Est Disputandum," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(2), pages 76-90, March.
    7. Peter Kennedy, 2003. "A Guide to Econometrics, 5th Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 5, volume 1, number 026261183x, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Rosa Duarte & José Julián Escario & José Alberto Molina, 2013. "Socio-demographic determinants of planning suicide and marijuana use among youths: are these patterns of behaviour causally related?," Documentos de Trabajo dt2013-03, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
    2. Okada, Keisuke & Samreth, Sovannroeun, 2013. "A study on the socio-economic determinants of suicide: Evidence from 13 European OECD countries," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 78-85.
    3. Jahyeong Koo & W. Michael Cox, 2008. "An Economic Interpretation Of Suicide Cycles In Japan," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 26(1), pages 162-174, January.
    4. Best, Paul & Manktelow, Roger & Taylor, Brian, 2014. "Online communication, social media and adolescent wellbeing: A systematic narrative review," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 27-36.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:11:y:2002:i:8:p:695-708. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.