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How Do Ozone Levels Influence the Timing of Residential Moves?

  • Brooks Depro
  • Raymond B. Palmquist
Registered author(s):

    Although there is evidence that people are aware of local ozone levels and may adjust their day-to-day routines when ozone levels change, little is known about the relationship between local ozone levels and the timing of residential moves. Results from a discrete-time hazard model suggest that homeowners living in areas with moderate to poor air quality are more likely to move when ozone levels are substantially different (better or worse) from the levels at the time of purchase.

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    File URL: http://le.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/88/1/43
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    Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Land Economics.

    Volume (Year): 88 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 43-57

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    Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:88:y:2012:i:1:p:43-57
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://le.uwpress.org/

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    1. Fernando Ferreira & Joseph Gyourko & Joseph Tracy, 2008. "Housing Busts and Household Mobility," NBER Working Papers 14310, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Patrick J. Bayer & Robert McMillan & Alvin Murphy & Christopher Timmins, 2011. "A Dynamic Model of Demand for Houses and Neighborhoods," Levine's Working Paper Archive 786969000000000213, David K. Levine.
    3. Engelhardt, Gary V., 2003. "Nominal loss aversion, housing equity constraints, and household mobility: evidence from the United States," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 171-195, January.
    4. Cutter, W. Bowman & Neidell, Matthew, 2009. "Voluntary information programs and environmental regulation: Evidence from 'Spare the Air'," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 253-265, November.
    5. Jeremy C. Stein, 1995. "Prices and Trading Volume in the Housing Market: A Model with Down-Payment Effects," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(2), pages 379-406.
    6. Matthew E. Kahn, 2000. "Smog Reduction's Impact on California County Growth," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(3), pages 565-582.
    7. Ferreira, Fernando, 2010. "You can take it with you: Proposition 13 tax benefits, residential mobility, and willingness to pay for housing amenities," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(9-10), pages 661-673, October.
    8. Weinberg, Daniel H. & Friedman, Joseph & Mayo, Stephen K., 1981. "Intraurban residential mobility: The role of transactions costs, market imperfections, and household disequilibrium," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 332-348, May.
    9. Cunningham, Christopher R. & Engelhardt, Gary V., 2008. "Housing capital-gains taxation and homeowner mobility: Evidence from the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(3), pages 803-815, May.
    10. Chan, Sewin, 2001. "Spatial Lock-in: Do Falling House Prices Constrain Residential Mobility?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 567-586, May.
    11. Palmquist, Raymond B., 1982. "Measuring environmental effects on property values without hedonic regressions," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 333-347, May.
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