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Smog Reduction's Impact on California County Growth

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  • Matthew E. Kahn

Abstract

Over the last twenty years, environmental regulation has sharply reduced pollution levels in the Los Angeles region. Population growth has soared in the Los Angeles suburbs that have experienced the largest pollution reductions. This paper posits that regulation has increased local quality of life which has encouraged in-migration. I explore alternative explanations for this growth. Copyright 2000 Blackwell Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew E. Kahn, 2000. "Smog Reduction's Impact on California County Growth," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(3), pages 565-582.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:40:y:2000:i:3:p:565-582
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    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/0022-4146.00188
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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. The Economics of Pollution Exposure
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2017-06-09 22:07:00
    2. Why is California Housing 4 Times as Expensive as Alabama Housing? Supply or Demand Revisited
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2017-07-18 19:50:00

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    Cited by:

    1. Miles M. Finney, 2014. "Information And The Demand For Clean Air," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(4), pages 719-728, October.
    2. Duranton, Gilles, 2002. "City size distributions as a consequence of the growth process," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20065, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Carolyn Kousky & Erzo Luttmer & Richard Zeckhauser, 2006. "Private investment and government protection," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 73-100, September.
    4. Banzhaf, H. Spencer & Walsh, Randy, 2006. "Do People Vote with Their Feet? An Empirical Test of Environmental Gentrification," Discussion Papers dp-06-10, Resources For the Future.
    5. Jesse M. Shapiro, 2003. "Smart Cities: Explaining the Relationship between City Growth and Human Capital," Urban/Regional 0309001, EconWPA.
    6. Billings, Stephen B. & Schnepel, Kevin T., 2017. "The value of a healthy home: Lead paint remediation and housing values," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 69-81.
    7. Christian L. Redfearn, 2004. "Land Markets & Terrorism: Uncovering Perceptions of Risk by Examining Land Price Changes Following 9/11," Working Paper 8591, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
    8. repec:rre:publsh:v47:y:2017:i:3:p:271-288 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Brooks Depro & Raymond B. Palmquist, 2012. "How Do Ozone Levels Influence the Timing of Residential Moves?," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 88(1), pages 43-57.

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