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Adoption of New Information and Communications Technologies in the Workplace Today

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  • Timothy Bresnahan
  • Pai-Ling Yin

Abstract

The invention of new applications based on information and communications technologies (ICTs) has had two economic effects up to now. These applications have transformed production, creating value for applications-inventing companies and their customers and increasing economic growth through quality improvements. The same applications have shifted the relative demand for different kinds of labor, raising the demand for already highly compensated managers and professionals relative to other workers. This paper considers the likely impact of new ICT technologies coming into application in the workplace today in light of the economic and technical forces behind ICT application up to now.

Suggested Citation

  • Timothy Bresnahan & Pai-Ling Yin, 2017. "Adoption of New Information and Communications Technologies in the Workplace Today," Innovation Policy and the Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(1), pages 95-124.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:ipolec:doi:10.1086/688846
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Peneder & Julia Bock-Schappelwein & Matthias Firgo & Oliver Fritz & Gerhard Streicher, 2017. "Economic Effects of Digitalisation in Austria," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 90(3), pages 177-192, March.

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    JEL classification:

    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights

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