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Les Inégalités Dans Le Domaine De L’Éducation En Turquie

  • Jamel TRABELSI


    (BETA, Université de Strasbourg et LEFA, Université de Sfax)

  • Levent UNSALDI


    (Université d’Ankara)

  • Jean-Claude VEREZ


    (Université d’Artois et LEAD)

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    Turkey faces the challenge of human investment and high inequality in education. The mapping of the country shows disparities by region, by gender, ethnicity, etc., according to the school cycles. Our study then analyzes the Turkish educational challenges in order to interpret and analyze the empirical results.

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    Article provided by Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var in its journal Region et Developpement.

    Volume (Year): 34 (2011)
    Issue (Month): ()
    Pages: 113-139

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    Handle: RePEc:tou:journl:v:34:y:2011:p:113-139
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    1. Aysit Tansel, 1999. "Public-Private Employment Choice, Wage Differentials and Gender in Turkey," Working Papers 9913, Economic Research Forum, revised May 1999.
    2. Tansel, Aysit, 1994. "Wage employment, earnings and returns to schooling for men and women in Turkey," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 305-320.
    3. Audrey Siew Kim LIM & Kam Ki TANG, 2008. "Human Capital Inequality And The Kuznets Curve," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 46(1), pages 26-51.
    4. Bob Hancke & Bruno Amable, 2001. "Introduction," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 109-111.
    5. Paul M Romer, 1999. "Increasing Returns and Long-Run Growth," Levine's Working Paper Archive 2232, David K. Levine.
    6. Thomas, Vinod & Wang, Yan & Fan, Xibo, 2001. "Measuring education inequality - Gini coefficients of education," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2525, The World Bank.
    7. Tansel, Aysit, 2002. "Determinants of school attainment of boys and girls in Turkey: individual, household and community factors," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 455-470, October.
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