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Does Trade Tariff Liberalisation Matter for Intra-ECOWAS Trade?

Author

Listed:
  • Mohammed Shuaibu

    (Department of Economics, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria Kaduna, Nigeria)

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between trade liberalisation and intra-regional trade in some selected ECOWAS member countries, with particular focus on the role of applied and most favoured nation import tariffs. Design/methodology/approach – Data utilized were sourced from the World Bank's World Development and Governance Indicators, Mayer and Zignago (2006) distance index as well as the World Trade Organisation's World Integrated Trade System (WiTs). The sample period consists of 8 countries covering the years 1998 to 2011. Predicated on a gravity framework, system and difference generalised method of moments dynamic panel data estimators were relied upon. Findings – The empirical results showed that trade liberalisation has contributed to intra-regional trade in the West African sub-region. The potency of trade liberalisation was relatively more pronounced through the use of most favoured nation import tariff compared to applied import tariff rates. Our results also showed that improved institutional quality and infrastructure are associated with higher intra-ECOWAS trade. Furthermore, using alternative measures of institutional quality and infrastructure as well as fixed and random effect estimators validated our findings. Research limitations/implications – Data limitations led to the inclusion of only 8 out of the 15 ECOWAS member countries in the sample. The research was also limited to tariff barriers as measure of trade liberalisation. The same methodology can be applied as data becomes available while a consideration of non-tariff barriers could provide more insights on the dynamics of intra-ECOWAS trade. Originality/value – The findings reinforce the notion that removal of trade restrictions particularly in the manufacturing sector, good governance and infrastructural developments enhance trade amongst ECOWAS countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohammed Shuaibu, 2015. "Does Trade Tariff Liberalisation Matter for Intra-ECOWAS Trade?," International Journal of Business and Economic Sciences Applied Research (IJBESAR), International Hellenic University (IHU), Kavala Campus, Greece (formerly Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Institute of Technology - EMaTTech), vol. 8(1), pages 83-112, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:tei:journl:v:8:y:2015:i:1:p:83-112
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    2. Asongu, Simplice A., 2017. "Assessing marginal, threshold, and net effects of financial globalisation on financial development in Africa," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 103-114.
    3. Samba Diop & Simplice A. Asongu, 2020. "An Index of African Monetary Integration (IAMI)," Working Papers 20/003, European Xtramile Centre of African Studies (EXCAS).
    4. John Ssozi & Simplice A. Asongu, 2016. "The Comparative Economics of Catch-up in Output per Worker, Total Factor Productivity and Technological Gain in Sub-Saharan Africa," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 28(2), pages 215-228, June.
    5. Simplice A. Asongu & Pritam Singh & Sara Le Roux, 2018. "Fighting Software Piracy: Some Global Conditional Policy Instruments," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 152(1), pages 175-189, September.
    6. Simplice Asongu & Lieven De Moor, 2015. "Financial globalisation and financial development in Africa: assessing marginal, threshold and net effects," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 15/040, African Governance and Development Institute..
    7. Simplice A. Asongu & Ghassen El Montasser & Hassen Toumi, 2015. "Testing the Relationships between Energy Consumption, CO2 emissions and Economic Growth in 24 African Countries: a Panel ARDL Approach," Research Africa Network Working Papers 15/037, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    8. Simplice Asongu & Vanessa Tchamyou, 2015. "The Comparative African Regional Economics of Globalization in Financial Allocation Efficiency," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 15/053, African Governance and Development Institute..
    9. Boniface Ngah Epo & Ronie Bertrand Nguenkwe, 2020. "Information and Communication Technology and Intra-Regional Trade in the Economic Community of West African States: Ambivalent or Complementary?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 40(2), pages 1397-1412.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Intra-ECOWAS trade; trade liberalisation; import tariffs; difference GMM and system GMM;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • C3 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables

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