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The role of shadow banking entities in the financial crisis: a disaggregated view

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  • Photis Lysandrou
  • Anastasia Nesvetailova

Abstract

This article examines the role of the shadow banking system in the global financial crisis of 2007-9. In order to do this, one must first explain the reasons for the explosive growth of shadow banking in the immediate pre-crisis era. Current explanations for this growth tend to hold two contrasting positions: one emphasising factors endogenous to the banking sector (notably regulatory arbitrage and financial innovation); the other emphasising exogenous factors (notably the 'search for yield'). Integrating these two explanations, in this article we develop a disaggregated view of the shadow banking system. After clarifying the nature of the relation between the regulated and shadow banking systems, we inquire more closely into the different entities that inhabit the shadow banking system, the different activities that these entities performed and the different financial products that these entities supplied. The disaggregated view of shadow banking suggests that while some parts of the system played an important role in the initial subprime phase of the crisis through their involvement with the toxic securities that were at its centre, other parts of the system were key to the subsequent money and inter-bank phases of the crisis through their close ties with the regulated banks.

Suggested Citation

  • Photis Lysandrou & Anastasia Nesvetailova, 2015. "The role of shadow banking entities in the financial crisis: a disaggregated view," Review of International Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(2), pages 257-279, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:rripxx:v:22:y:2015:i:2:p:257-279
    DOI: 10.1080/09692290.2014.896269
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Goda, Thomas & Lysandrou, Photis & Stewart, Chris, 2013. "The contribution of US bond demand to the US bond yield conundrum of 2004–2007: An empirical investigation," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 113-136.
    2. Thomas Goda & Photis Lysandrou, 2014. "The contribution of wealth concentration to the subprime crisis: a quantitative estimation," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(2), pages 301-327.
    3. Claudio Borio & William Nelson, 2008. "Monetary operations and the financial turmoil," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, March.
    4. Gorton, Gary B., 2010. "Slapped by the Invisible Hand: The Panic of 2007," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199734153.
    5. Raghuram G. Rajan, 2005. "Has financial development made the world riskier?," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Aug, pages 313-369.
    6. Gorton, Gary & Metrick, Andrew, 2012. "Securitized banking and the run on repo," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(3), pages 425-451.
    7. Markus K. Brunnermeier, 2009. "Deciphering the Liquidity and Credit Crunch 2007-2008," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(1), pages 77-100, Winter.
    8. Adrian Blundell-Wignall, 2007. "Structured Products: Implications for Financial Markets," Financial Market Trends, OECD Publishing, vol. 2007(2), pages 27-57.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jo Michell, 2017. "Do Shadow Banks Create Money? ‘Financialisation’ and the Monetary Circuit," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(2), pages 354-377, May.
    2. Ronen Palan, 2015. "Futurity, Pro-cyclicality and Financial Crises," New Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 367-385, June.
    3. Alberto Botta & Eugenio Caverzasi & Daniele Tori, 2015. "Financial–Real-Side Interactions in an Extended Monetary Circuit with Shadow Banking: Loving or Dangerous Hugs?," International Journal of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(3), pages 196-227, July.
    4. repec:bla:metroe:v:68:y:2017:i:2:p:321-353 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Endrejat, Vanessa & Thiemann, Matthias, 2018. "Reviving the shadow banking chain in Europe: Regulatory agency, technical complexity and the dynamics of co-habitation," SAFE Working Paper Series 222, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    6. Andrea Mazzocchetti & Marco Raberto & Andrea Teglio & Silvano Cincotti, 2018. "Securitization and business cycle: an agent-based perspective," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(6), pages 1091-1121.
    7. Anastasia Nesvetailova, 2015. "A Crisis of the Overcrowded Future: Shadow Banking and the Political Economy of Financial Innovation," New Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 431-453, June.
    8. Javier Garcia-Bernardo & Jan Fichtner & Eelke M. Heemskerk & Frank W. Takes, 2017. "Uncovering Offshore Financial Centers: Conduits and Sinks in the Global Corporate Ownership Network," Papers 1703.03016, arXiv.org, revised May 2017.

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