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Shared Knowledge and the Coagglomeration of Occupations

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  • Todd M. Gabe
  • Jaison R. Abel

Abstract

Gabe T. M. and Abel J. R. Shared knowledge and the coagglomeration of occupations, Regional Studies. This paper examines the extent to which people in different occupations locate near one another, or coagglomerate. Ellison–Glaeser coagglomeration indices are constructed for US occupations and used to investigate factors influencing the geographic concentration of economic activity. Empirical results reveal that occupations with similar knowledge requirements tend to coagglomerate, and the importance of shared knowledge is larger in metropolitan areas than in states. An extension to the main analysis finds that, when focusing on metropolitan areas, the largest effects on coagglomeration are due to shared knowledge about engineering and technology, arts and humanities, manufacturing and production, and mathematics and science.

Suggested Citation

  • Todd M. Gabe & Jaison R. Abel, 2016. "Shared Knowledge and the Coagglomeration of Occupations," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(8), pages 1360-1373, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:regstd:v:50:y:2016:i:8:p:1360-1373
    DOI: 10.1080/00343404.2015.1010498
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Megha Mukim, 2015. "Coagglomeration of formal and informal industry: evidence from India," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(2), pages 329-351.
    2. Behrens, Kristian & Guillain, Rachel, 2017. "The determinants of coagglomeration: Evidence from functional employment patterns," CEPR Discussion Papers 11884, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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