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Employment and Capital Accumulation in Unionised Labour Markets: Evidence from five south-European countries

  • Natasha Miaouli

This paper analyses the link between employment and capital accumulation in unionised labour markets by using a dynamic monopoly union model. The role of wage setting is also explored within the above context. The empirical analysis is based on annual data from the manufacturing sector of five European countries (France, Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain). It verifies that capital accumulation has a positive influence on employment. Concerning wages, there is evidence that, in most countries, income opportunities in the public sector play an important role in wage determination. A larger public sector crowds out private investment and employment by serving as a safety net that allows wage setters to push for higher wage demands.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal International Review of Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 15 (2001)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 5-29

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Handle: RePEc:taf:irapec:v:15:y:2001:i:1:p:5-29
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  1. Devereux, Michael B. & Lockwood, Ben, 1991. "Trade unions, non-binding wage agreements, and capital accumulation," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(7), pages 1411-1426, October.
  2. Danthine, Jean-Pierre & Hunt, Jennifer, 1994. "Wage Bargaining Structure, Employment and Economic Integration," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(424), pages 528-41, May.
  3. Barro, Robert J, 1981. "Output Effects of Government Purchases," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(6), pages 1086-1121, December.
  4. Drew Fudenberg & Jean Tirole, 1991. "Game Theory," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262061414, June.
  5. Pesaran, M.H. & Shin, Y., 1993. "Cointegration and Speed of Convergence to Equilibrium," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9311, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  6. Obstfeld, Maurice, 1990. "A Model of Currency Depreciation and the Debt-Inflation Spiral," CEPR Discussion Papers 431, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Mankiw, N. Gregory & Campbell, John, 1987. "Permanent and Transitory Components in Macroeconomic Fluctuations," Scholarly Articles 3207697, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  8. Layard, Richard & Nickell, Stephen & Jackman, Richard, 2005. "Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199279173, July.
  9. Simon Anderson & Michael Devereux, 1985. "Trade Unions and the Choice of Capital Stock," Working Papers 600, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  10. Lockwood, Ben & Manning, Alan, 1989. "Dynamic Wage-Employment Bargaining with Employment Adjustment Costs," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(398), pages 1143-58, December.
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