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Testing the Robustness of Public Spending Determinants on Public Spending Decisions in Nigeria

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  • Samson Adeniyi Aladejare

Abstract

This study tests the robustness of variables used in determining public spending in Nigeria from 1970 to 2016. This is achieved through the simultaneous use of a symmetric and asymmetric ARDL and Toda–Yamamoto causality procedures. The empirical findings reveal sufficient evidence of asymmetry in the behaviour of policy variables such as oil price, inflation rate, and the exchange rate. Hence, the conclusion that asymmetry significantly exists in key variables, used by Nigerian fiscal authorities for spending decision-making. Also, the asymmetric Toda–Yamamoto causality result reveals that increase in oil price, depreciation in the Naira value, and government revenue are the key determinants of public spending. Hence, the revenue-spend hypothesis. It is recommended that the re-investment of surplus proceeds from oil receipts should be given much priority. Specifically, the re-investment of such revenues into sectors such as manufacturing, construction, and information technology, will speed-up the diversification process of the revenue base; and sufficiently reduce the negative effects a decline in the oil price, and the Naira exchange rate will have on public spending. The policy of inflation targeting by the monetary authority should be sustained to check unwarranted inflationary trajectory; which may have an adverse effect on public spending value.

Suggested Citation

  • Samson Adeniyi Aladejare, 2019. "Testing the Robustness of Public Spending Determinants on Public Spending Decisions in Nigeria," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(1), pages 65-87, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:intecj:v:33:y:2019:i:1:p:65-87
    DOI: 10.1080/10168737.2019.1570302
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    References listed on IDEAS

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