IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/poleco/v15y1999i4p687-704.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Fiscal illusion and the demand for government expenditures in the UK

Author

Listed:
  • Gemmell, Norman
  • Morrissey, Oliver
  • Pinar, Abuzer

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Gemmell, Norman & Morrissey, Oliver & Pinar, Abuzer, 1999. "Fiscal illusion and the demand for government expenditures in the UK," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 687-704, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:poleco:v:15:y:1999:i:4:p:687-704
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0176-2680(99)00030-0
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Clotfelter, Charles T, 1976. "Public Spending for Higher Education: An Empirical Test of Two Hypotheses," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 31(2), pages 177-195.
    2. Bergstrom, Theodore C & Goodman, Robert P, 1973. "Private Demands for Public Goods," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(3), pages 280-296, June.
    3. Henrekson, Magnus, 1990. "The Peacock and Wiseman displacement effect : A reappraisal and a new test," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 245-260, October.
    4. Ashworth, John, 1994. "Spurious in Mexico: A Comment on Wagner's Law," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 49(2), pages 282-286.
    5. Henrekson, Magnus, 1993. "Wagner's Law--A Spurious Relationship?," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 48(3), pages 406-415.
    6. Nomura, Masuo, 1991. "The Displacement Effect on Government Expenditure of Two Oil Crises: Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 59(4), pages 408-418, December.
    7. Lin, Chi-Ang, 1995. "More Evidence on Wagner's Law for Mexico," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 50(2), pages 267-277.
    8. Pommerehne, Werner W & Schneider, Friedrich, 1978. "Fiscal Illusion, Political Institutions, and Local Public Spending," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(3), pages 381-408.
    9. Dollery, Brian E & Worthington, Andrew C, 1996. " The Empirical Analysis of Fiscal Illusion," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 10(3), pages 261-297, September.
    10. Alan T. Peacock & Jack Wiseman, 1961. "The Growth of Public Expenditure in the United Kingdom," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number peac61-1, January.
    11. Ashworth, John, 1995. "The Empirical Relationship between Budgetary Deficits and Government Expenditure Growth: An Examination Using Cointegration," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 50(1), pages 1-18.
    12. Gemmell, Norman, 1990. "Wagner's Law, Relative Prices and the Size of the Public Sector," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 58(4), pages 361-377, December.
    13. Hondroyiannis, George & Papapetrou, Evangelia, 1995. "An Examination of Wagner's Law for Greece: A Cointegration Analysis," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 50(1), pages 67-79.
    14. Bird, Richard M, 1971. "Wagner's o Law' of Expanding State Activity," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 26(1), pages 1-26.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. David Heres & Steffen Kallbekken & Ibon Galarraga, 2013. "Understanding Public Support for Externality-Correcting Taxes and Subsidies: A Lab Experiment," Working Papers 2013-04, BC3.
    2. Sanz, Ismael & Velazquez, Francisco J., 2007. "The role of ageing in the growth of government and social welfare spending in the OECD," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 917-931, December.
    3. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:8:y:2007:i:4:p:1-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. James Alm & Abel Embaye, 2010. "Explaining The Growth Of Government Spending In South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 78(2), pages 152-169, June.
    5. Mark McGillivray & Oliver Morrissey, 2000. "Aid fungibility in Assessing Aid: red herring or true concern?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(3), pages 413-428, April.
    6. Ismael Sanz & Francisco Javier Velázquez, 2002. "Determinants of the Composition of Government Expenditure by Functions," European Economy Group Working Papers 13, European Economy Group.
    7. Sanz, Ismael & Velazquez, Francisco J, 2003. "What do OECD countries cut first at a time of fiscal adjustments? A dynamic panel data approach," University of California at Santa Barbara, Economics Working Paper Series qt4j744960, Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara.
    8. repec:eco:journ1:2017-04-47 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Yi-Chung Hsu, 2014. "Efficiency in government health spending: a super slacks-based model," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 48(1), pages 111-126, January.
    10. Gemmell, Norman & Morrissey, Oliver & Pinar, Abuzer, 2003. "Tax perceptions and the demand for public expenditure: evidence from UK micro-data," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 793-816, November.
    11. Gemmell, Norman & Kneller, Richard & Sanz, Ismael, 2008. "Foreign investment, international trade and the size and structure of public expenditures," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 151-171, March.
    12. Julian Ramajo & Javier Salinas & Francisco Pedraja & Miguel Márquez, 2007. "Competition in the allocation of public spending: a new model to analyse the interaction between expenditure categories," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 8(4), pages 1-7.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:poleco:v:15:y:1999:i:4:p:687-704. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505544 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.