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Public Spending for Higher Education: An Empirical Test of Two Hypotheses

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  • Clotfelter, Charles T

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  • Clotfelter, Charles T, 1976. "Public Spending for Higher Education: An Empirical Test of Two Hypotheses," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 31(2), pages 177-195.
  • Handle: RePEc:pfi:pubfin:v:31:y:1976:i:2:p:177-95
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    Cited by:

    1. Gemmell, Norman & Morrissey, Oliver & Pinar, Abuzer, 1999. "Fiscal illusion and the demand for government expenditures in the UK," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 687-704, November.
    2. Kathleen Carroll & Lisa M. Dickson & Jane E. Ruseski, 2013. "Do Faculty Matter? Effects of Faculty Participation in University Decisions," UMBC Economics Department Working Papers 13-06, UMBC Department of Economics.
    3. Friedrich Schneider, 2000. "The Increase of the size of the shadow economy of 18 OECD countries: Some preliminary explanations," Economics working papers 2000-08, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    4. Facchini, Francois, 2014. "The determinants of public spending: a survey in a methodological perspective," MPRA Paper 53006, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Roberto Dell'Anno & Vincenzo Maria De Rosa, 2013. "The Relevance of the Theory of Fiscal Illusion. The Case of the Italian Tax System," HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT AND POLICY, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2013(2), pages 63-92.
    6. Roberto Dell'Anno & Morena De Stefano, 2014. "Un indicatore sintetico dell’Illusione Finanziaria. Un tentativo di stima per l’Italia," ECONOMIA PUBBLICA, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2014(1), pages 65-92.
    7. Walter Misiolek & Harold Elder, 1988. "Tax structure and the size of government: An empirical analysis of the fiscal illusion and fiscal stress arguments," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 57(3), pages 233-245, June.
    8. Bridget Terry Long, 2003. "The Impact of Federal Tax Credits for Higher Education Expenses," NBER Working Papers 9553, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. E. West & Stanley Winer, 1980. "Optimal fiscal illusion and the size of government," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 35(5), pages 607-622, January.
    10. Turnbull, Geoffrey K., 1998. "The Overspending and Flypaper Effects of Fiscal Illusion: Theory and Empirical Evidence," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 1-26, July.
    11. Robert R. Dunn, 2015. "Outmigration and State and Local Appropriations for Public Higher Education," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 45(3), pages 237-251, Winter.
    12. Lowry, Robert C., 2001. "The effects of state political interests and campus outputs on public university revenues," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 105-119, April.
    13. Roberto Dell’Anno & Brian Dollery, 2014. "Comparative fiscal illusion: a fiscal illusion index for the European Union," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 46(3), pages 937-960, May.
    14. John Bound & Jeffrey Groen & Gabor Kezdi & Sarah Turner, 2001. "Trade in University Training: Cross-State Variation in the Production and Use of College-Educated Labor," NBER Working Papers 8555, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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