IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/defpea/v29y2018i7p780-793.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Does Health Spending Crowd out Defense in the United States? Evidence from Wavelet Multiresolution Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Wen-Yi Chen
  • Yai-Wun Liang
  • Yu-Hui Lin

Abstract

This study investigates the association between defense and health spending using multi-resolution analysis incorporating the structural change model. Our empirical results suggested that a negative correlation between defense and health spending persists over the entire period of 1941–2013 in the very long-run (over 16 years cycle), but there is a change in correlation between defense and health spending in the short-run (2–4 years cycle), medium-run (4–8 years cycle), and long-run (8–16 years cycle) during the same period. In particular, there appears to have been a trade-off relationship between defense and health spending during the ex-Korean War period, but there was a complementary relationship between defense and health spending during the post-Korean War period. The crowding-out effect of health spending on defense spending during the period when the Affordable Care Act was put into effect relies on the strength of the positive correlation in the long-run (8–16 years cycle) and negative correlation in the short-run (2–4 years cycle) and very long-run (over 16 years cycle).

Suggested Citation

  • Wen-Yi Chen & Yai-Wun Liang & Yu-Hui Lin, 2018. "Does Health Spending Crowd out Defense in the United States? Evidence from Wavelet Multiresolution Analysis," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(7), pages 780-793, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:29:y:2018:i:7:p:780-793
    DOI: 10.1080/10242694.2017.1302772
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/10242694.2017.1302772
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1080/10242694.2017.1302772?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mikael Svensson & Niclas Krüger, 2012. "Mortality and economic fluctuations," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(4), pages 1215-1235, October.
    2. Wen-Yi Chen & Yia-Wun Liang & Yu-Hui Lin, 2016. "Is the United States in the middle of a healthcare bubble?," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(1), pages 99-111, January.
    3. Wen-Yi Chen & Miin-Jye Wen & Yu-Hui Lin & Yia-Wun Liang, 2016. "On the relationship between healthcare expenditure and longevity: evidence from the continuous wavelet analyses," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 1041-1057, May.
    4. Robert J. Barro, 2013. "Health and Economic Growth," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 14(2), pages 329-366, November.
    5. Christos Kollias & Susana-Maria Paleologou, 2011. "Budgetary trade-offs between defence, education and social spending in Greece," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(11), pages 1071-1075.
    6. Jos� Jurado-Sánchez & Miguel Jerez-M�ndez, 2012. "Warfare, Economic Performance And The Struggle For World Hegemony In The Early Modern Period: Guns Versus Butter In Eighteenth-Century Britain And Spain," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(4), pages 389-412, August.
    7. Yu Wang, 2014. "Guns--butter tradeoff in contemporary China," Defense & Security Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(1), pages 67-75, March.
    8. Wen-Yi Chen & Yia-Wun Liang & Yu-Hui Lin, 2016. "Is the United States in the middle of a healthcare bubble?," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(1), pages 99-111, January.
    9. J. Paul Dunne & Ron Smith & Dirk Willenbockel, 2005. "Models Of Military Expenditure And Growth: A Critical Review," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(6), pages 449-461.
    10. Corbae,Dean & Durlauf,Steven N. & Hansen,Bruce E. (ed.), 2006. "Econometric Theory and Practice," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521807234.
    11. Ali Hamid E., 2011. "Military Expenditures and Human Development: Guns and Butter Arguments Revisited: A Case Study from Egypt," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 17(1), pages 1-21, September.
    12. Sibel Bali Eryigit & Kadir Yasin Eryigit & Ufuk Selen, 2012. "The Long-Run Linkages Between Education, Health And Defence Expenditures And Economic Growth: Evidence From Turkey," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(6), pages 559-574, December.
    13. Ramsey, James B. & Lampart, Camille, 1998. "Decomposition Of Economic Relationships By Timescale Using Wavelets," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 2(1), pages 49-71, March.
    14. Jushan Bai & Pierre Perron, 2003. "Computation and analysis of multiple structural change models," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(1), pages 1-22.
    15. Patrick M. Crowley & Andrew Hughes Hallett, 2014. "The Great Moderation Under the Microscope: Decomposition of Macroeconomic Cycles in US and UK Aggregate Demand," Dynamic Modeling and Econometrics in Economics and Finance, in: Marco Gallegati & Willi Semmler (ed.), Wavelet Applications in Economics and Finance, edition 127, pages 47-71, Springer.
    16. Luís Aguiar-Conraria & Maria Joana Soares, 2014. "The Continuous Wavelet Transform: Moving Beyond Uni- And Bivariate Analysis," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(2), pages 344-375, April.
    17. Eric S. Lin & Hamid E. Ali & Yu-Lung Lu, 2015. "Does Military Spending Crowd Out Social Welfare Expenditures? Evidence from a Panel of OECD Countries," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(1), pages 33-48, February.
    18. Mintz, Alex, 1989. "Guns Versus Butter: A Disaggregated Analysis," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 83(4), pages 1285-1293, December.
    19. Wen-Yi Chen, 2016. "Health progress and economic growth in the USA: the continuous wavelet analysis," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 831-855, May.
    20. Gençay, Ramazan & Gençay, Ramazan & Selçuk, Faruk & Whitcher, Brandon J., 2001. "An Introduction to Wavelets and Other Filtering Methods in Finance and Economics," Elsevier Monographs, Elsevier, edition 1, number 9780122796708.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Wen-Yi CHEN & Yu-Hui LIN, 2016. "Co-Movement of Healthcare Financing in OECD Countries: Evidence from Discrete Wavelet Analyses," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(3), pages 40-56, September.
    2. Yingying Xu & Hsu Ling Chang & Chi Wei Su & Adelina Dumitrescu, 2018. "Guns for Butter? Empirical Evidence from China," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(7), pages 809-820, November.
    3. Ying Zhang & Xiaoxing Liu & Rui Wang & Ruobing Tang, 2016. "Revisiting the “Guns versus Butter” Argument in China (1950–2014): New Evidence from the Continuous Wavelet Analysis," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 8(7), pages 1-13, July.
    4. Chiung-Ju Huang & Yuan-Hong Ho, 2018. "Does Taiwan's Defense Spending Crowd out Education and Social Welfare Expenditures?," Journal of Economics and Management, College of Business, Feng Chia University, Taiwan, vol. 14(1), pages 67-82, February.
    5. Chen, Mei-Ping & Chen, Wen-Yi & Tseng, Tseng-Chan, 2017. "Co-movements of returns in the health care sectors from the US, UK, and Germany stock markets: Evidence from the continuous wavelet analyses," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 484-498.
    6. Wen-Yi Chen, 2016. "Health progress and economic growth in the USA: the continuous wavelet analysis," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 831-855, May.
    7. Abid, Fathi & Kaffel, Bilel, 2018. "Time–frequency wavelet analysis of the interrelationship between the global macro assets and the fear indexes," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 490(C), pages 1028-1045.
    8. Eric S. Lin & Hamid E. Ali & Yu-Lung Lu, 2015. "Does Military Spending Crowd Out Social Welfare Expenditures? Evidence from a Panel of OECD Countries," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(1), pages 33-48, February.
    9. Caraiani, Petre, 2015. "Estimating DSGE models across time and frequency," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 33-49.
    10. Ying Zhang & Xiaoxing Liu & Jiaxin Xu & Rui Wang, 2017. "Does military spending promote social welfare? A comparative analysis of the BRICS and G7 countries," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(6), pages 686-702, November.
    11. Usman Khalid & Olivier Habimana, 2021. "Military Spending and Economic Growth in Turkey: A Wavelet Approach," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(3), pages 362-376, April.
    12. Antony, Jürgen & Klarl, Torben, 2020. "Estimating the income inequality-health relationship for the United States between 1941 and 2015: Will the relevant frequencies please stand up?," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 17(C).
    13. Brian Lucey & Fergal O’connor, 2017. "Are gold bugs coherent?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(2), pages 90-94, January.
    14. Adam Coutts & Adel Daoud & Ali Fakih & Walid Marrouch & Bernhard Reinsberg, 2019. "Guns and butter? Military expenditure and health spending on the eve of the Arab Spring," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(2), pages 227-237, February.
    15. Ferrer, Román & Bolós, Vicente J. & Benítez, Rafael, 2016. "Interest rate changes and stock returns: A European multi-country study with wavelets," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 1-12.
    16. Michis Antonis A, 2009. "Regression Analysis of Marketing Time Series: A Wavelet Approach with Some Frequency Domain Insights," Review of Marketing Science, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 1-43, July.
    17. Meng Xu & Avishai Ceder & Ziyou Gao & Wei Guan, 2010. "Mass transit systems of Beijing: governance evolution and analysis," Transportation, Springer, vol. 37(5), pages 709-729, September.
    18. Shaeri, Komeil & Adaoglu, Cahit & Katircioglu, Salih T., 2016. "Oil price risk exposure: A comparison of financial and non-financial subsectors," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 712-723.
    19. Uk Heo & Min Ye, 2016. "Defense Spending and Economic Growth around the Globe: The Direct and Indirect Link," International Interactions, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(5), pages 774-796, October.
    20. Altansukh, Gantungalag & Becker, Ralf & Bratsiotis, George J. & Osborn, Denise R., 2017. "What is the Globalisation of Inflation?," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 1-27.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:29:y:2018:i:7:p:780-793. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/GDPE20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Chris Longhurst (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/GDPE20 .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.