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The effect of political regimes and technology on economic growth

Author

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  • Khurram Jamali
  • Kirsten Wandschneider
  • Phanindra Wunnava

Abstract

Do political regimes have a significant effect on economic growth? This study builds on the new neoclassical growth model to identify economic determinants of growth, and explicitly tests for the influence of political variables on economic performance for the 1990s. The results suggest that democracies and bureaucracies significantly outperform autocracies. Economic growth is also promoted by increased protection of property rights, and higher investment in education. Moreover, technology has become a requirement for efficient production, and hence, is crucial in promoting growth. Countries can therefore increase the level of economic growth by increasing the levels of education and technology in the economy, and establishing codified laws to foster property rights.

Suggested Citation

  • Khurram Jamali & Kirsten Wandschneider & Phanindra Wunnava, 2007. "The effect of political regimes and technology on economic growth," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(11), pages 1425-1432.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:39:y:2007:i:11:p:1425-1432
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840500447906
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    Cited by:

    1. Libman, Alexander, 2013. "Natural resources and sub-national economic performance: Does sub-national democracy matter?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 82-99.
    2. Phanindra V. Wunnava & Aniruddha Mitra & Robert E. Prasch, 2015. "Globalization and the Ethnic Divide: Recent Longitudinal Evidence," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 96(5), pages 1475-1492, November.
    3. Adrian Boos & Karin Holm-Müller, 2016. "The Zambian Resource Curse and its influence on Genuine Savings as an indicator for “weak” sustainable development," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 18(3), pages 881-919, June.
    4. Wunnava, Phanindra V. & Mitra, Aniruddha & Prasch, Robert E., 2012. "Globalization, Institutions, and the Ethnic Divide: Recent Longitudinal Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 6459, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Alexander Libman, 2012. "Democracy, size of bureaucracy, and economic growth: evidence from Russian regions," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 1321-1352, December.
    6. Wunnava, Phanindra V. & Leiter, Daniel B., 2008. "Determinants of Inter-Country Internet Diffusion Rates," IZA Discussion Papers 3666, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Libman, Alexander, 2008. "Democracy and growth: is the effect non-linear?," MPRA Paper 17795, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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