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Measuring worker flows

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  • Peter Huber
  • Kristin Smeral

Abstract

The study explores differences between two measurement concepts of worker flows widely used in the literature referred to as the turnover and reallocation concepts. It is found that measuring worker flows by the turnover concept leads to substantially (about 5% of total employment) higher worker flow estimates and slightly increases age, size and industry group effects on firm level worker flows as well as differences between growing and declining firms relative to the reallocation concept.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Huber & Kristin Smeral, 2006. "Measuring worker flows," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(14), pages 1689-1695.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:38:y:2006:i:14:p:1689-1695 DOI: 10.1080/00036840500392482
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    Cited by:

    1. Gunther Tichy, 2014. "Flexicurity – A Concept Doomed to Failure," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 87(8), pages 537-553, August.
    2. Francisca Bremberger & Rudolf Hochholzer & Peter Huber, 2016. "Labour Turnover, Employment Density and Employer Provided Training: Evidence from Vienna," European Journal of Business Science and Technology, Mendel University in Brno, Faculty of Business and Economics, vol. 2(1), pages 5-22, November.
    3. Andrew Kerr, 2016. "Job flows, worker flows, and churning in South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 037, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Francisca Bauer & Rudolf Hochholzer & Peter Huber, 2010. "Labour Turnover, Labour Market Density and In-house Training. Preliminary Results of the Vienna Employment and Skilling Monitor," WIFO Working Papers 367, WIFO.

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