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Stock market development and economic growth in Ghana: an ARDL-bounds testing approach

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  • Erasmus L. Owusu
  • Nicholas M. Odhiambo

Abstract

This article examines the relationship between stock market development and sustainable economic growth in Ghana. The study employs the recently developed ARDL-bounds testing approach and multidimensional stock market development proxies to examine this linkage. The article finds that in the long run, stock market developments and capital account liberalization policies have no positive effect on economic growth in Ghana. This finding supports the numerous past studies, which have reported negative or inconclusive results on the effects of stock market development on economic growth. The article, therefore, concludes that it is the increase in credit to the private sector, rather than stock market development that drives the real sector development in Ghana.

Suggested Citation

  • Erasmus L. Owusu & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2014. "Stock market development and economic growth in Ghana: an ARDL-bounds testing approach," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(4), pages 229-234, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:21:y:2014:i:4:p:229-234
    DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2013.844315
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Peter Blair Henry, 2007. "Capital Account Liberalization: Theory, Evidence, and Speculation," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 45(4), pages 887-935, December.
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    3. Bekaert, Geert & Harvey, Campbell R. & Lundblad, Christian, 2005. "Does financial liberalization spur growth?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 3-55, July.
    4. Peter Henry, 2007. "Capital Account Liberalization: Theory, Evidence, and Speculation," Discussion Papers 07-004, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    5. Demirguc-Kunt, Ash & Levine, Ross, 1996. "Stock Market Development and Financial Intermediaries: Stylized Facts," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 10(2), pages 291-321, May.
    6. M. Hashem Pesaran & Yongcheol Shin & Richard J. Smith, 2001. "Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 289-326.
    7. Ben Naceur, Samy & Ghazouani, Samir & Omran, Mohammed, 2008. "Does stock market liberalization spur financial and economic development in the MENA region?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 673-693, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kodila-Tedika, Oasis & Asongu, Simplice A. & Cinyabuguma, Matthias & Tchamyou, Vanessa S., 2017. "Financial development and prehistoric geographical isolation: global evidence," Financial History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 24(03), pages 283-306, December.
    2. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2019. "ICT, Financial Sector Development and Financial Access," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 10(2), pages 465-490, June.
    3. Asongu, Simplice A., 2017. "Assessing marginal, threshold, and net effects of financial globalisation on financial development in Africa," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 103-114.
    4. Simplice A. Asongu & Jules R. Minkoua N., 2018. "Dynamic openness and finance in Africa," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(4), pages 409-430, May.
    5. Asongu, Simplice A. & Nwachukwu, Jacinta C., 2017. "The synergy of financial sector development and information sharing in financial access: Propositions and empirical evidence," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 242-258.
    6. Simplice A. Asongu & John C. Anyanwu & Vanessa S. Tchamyou, 2017. "Technology-driven information sharing and conditional financial development in Africa," Research Africa Network Working Papers 17/010, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    7. Asongu, Simplice A., 2017. "The effect of reducing information asymmetry on loan price and quantity in the African banking industry," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 185-197.
    8. Simplice A. Asongu & Paul N. Acha-Anyi, 2017. "ICT, conflicts in financial intermediation and financial access: evidence of synergy and threshold effects," Netnomics, Springer, vol. 18(2), pages 131-168, December.
    9. Simplice Asongu & Jacinta Nwachukwu, 2017. "Information asymmetry and conditional financial sector development," Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 9(4), pages 372-392, November.
    10. Asongu, Simplice A. & Biekpe, Nicholas, 2018. "ICT, information asymmetry and market power in African banking industry," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 518-531.
    11. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2017. "At what levels of financial development does information sharing matter?," Financial Innovation, Springer;Southwestern University of Finance and Economics, vol. 3(1), pages 1-30, December.
    12. Paetz, Michael & Gupta, Rangan, 2016. "Stock price dynamics and the business cycle in an estimated DSGE model for South Africa," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 166-182.
    13. Erasmus L Owusu, 2016. "Stock Market and Sustainable Economic Growth in Nigeria," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(4), pages 1-13, November.
    14. Yilmaz Bayar & Abdulkadir Kaya & Murat Yildirim, 2014. "Effects of Stock Market Development on Economic Growth: Evidence from Turkey," International Journal of Financial Research, International Journal of Financial Research, Sciedu Press, vol. 5(1), pages 93-100, January.

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