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Drivers of rural-urban migration and impact on food security in rural Tanzania

Author

Listed:
  • Isabell Duda

    (Leibniz University Hannover)

  • Anja Fasse

    () (Weihenstephan-Triesdorf University of Applied Sciences, TUM Campus Straubing)

  • Ulrike Grote

    (Leibniz University Hannover)

Abstract

Abstract This paper contributes to (1) the Valletta action plan by identifying root causes of migration in Africa, and (2) the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda reflecting the close links between migration and development. Our objectives are to identify drivers of rural-urban migration in Tanzania and to examine its impact on food security. The analyses are based on survey data of 900 rural households in the Dodoma and Morogoro districts of Tanzania from 2013. The logistic regression revealed that several household characteristics such as age of the household head, household size, and dependency ratio, but also employment and welfare status determine whether any household member migrates from the rural area to an urban area. Households from the more remote and food insecure Dodoma district were more likely to have migrants looking for jobs than households from Morogoro district. The Propensity Score Matching approach revealed that migration significantly worsens the food security status of rural migrant households in terms of access, availability and stability. This outcome is explained by the loss in labor input, leading to lower agricultural productivity of rural households, which cannot be compensated by the transfer of remittances from their respective migrants. Thus, migration does not always function as a pathway out of food insecurity in developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Isabell Duda & Anja Fasse & Ulrike Grote, 2018. "Drivers of rural-urban migration and impact on food security in rural Tanzania," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(4), pages 785-798, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ssefpa:v:10:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s12571-018-0788-1
    DOI: 10.1007/s12571-018-0788-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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