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Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological theory for modelling community resilience to natural disasters

Author

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  • Helen Boon

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  • Alison Cottrell
  • David King
  • Robert Stevenson
  • Joanne Millar

Abstract

This paper advocates the use of Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological theory as a framework to analyse resilience at diverse scales. Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological theory can be employed to (a) benchmark social resilience, (b) target the priority interventions required and (c) measure progress arising from these interventions to enhance resilience to natural disasters. First, the paper explores resilience to natural disasters in the context of climatic change as building resilience is seen as a way to mitigate impacts of natural disasters. Second, concepts of resilience are systematically examined and documented, outlining resilience as a trait and resilience as a process. Third, issues arising in relation to the measurement of resilience are discussed. Fourth, Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological systems theory is described and proffered to model and assess resilience at different scales. Fifth, studies are described which have supported the use of the bioecological systems theory for the study of resilience. Sixth, an example of the use of Bronfenbrenner’s theory is offered and the paper concludes with suggestions for future research using Bronfenbrenner’s theory. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Helen Boon & Alison Cottrell & David King & Robert Stevenson & Joanne Millar, 2012. "Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological theory for modelling community resilience to natural disasters," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 60(2), pages 381-408, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:nathaz:v:60:y:2012:i:2:p:381-408
    DOI: 10.1007/s11069-011-0021-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jenni Hyvärinen & Marita Vos, 2015. "Developing a Conceptual Framework for Investigating Communication Supporting Community Resilience," Societies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(3), pages 1-15, July.
    2. Ivan Townshend & Olu Awosoga & Judith Kulig & HaiYan Fan, 2015. "Social cohesion and resilience across communities that have experienced a disaster," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 76(2), pages 913-938, March.
    3. Yi Lu & Jiuping Xu, 2016. "Low-carbon Reconstruction: A Meta-Synthesis Approach for the Sustainable Development of a Post-Disaster Community," Systems Research and Behavioral Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(1), pages 173-187, January.
    4. Judith Kulig & Anna Pujadas Botey, 2016. "Facing a wildfire: What did we learn about individual and community resilience?," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 82(3), pages 1919-1929, July.
    5. Laura Milani Marin & Vincenzo Russo, 2016. "Re-localizing ‘legal’ food: a social psychology perspective on community resilience, individual empowerment and citizen adaptations in food consumption in Southern Italy," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 33(1), pages 179-190, March.
    6. Xin Miao & David Banister & Yanhong Tang, 2013. "Embedding resilience in emergency resource management to cope with natural hazards," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 69(3), pages 1389-1404, December.
    7. Laura Emma Milani Marin & Vincenzo Russo, 2016. "Re-localizing ‘legal’ food: a social psychology perspective on community resilience, individual empowerment and citizen adaptations in food consumption in Southern Italy," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 33(1), pages 179-190, March.

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