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Whose resilience matters? Like-for-like comparison of objective and subjective evaluations of resilience

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  • Jones, Lindsey
  • d'Errico, Marco

Abstract

As resilience continues its rise to top of the international policy agenda, development funders and practitioners are under mounting pressure to ensure that investments in resilience-building are effective and targeted at those most in need. It is here that robust resilience measurement can make valuable contributions: identifying hotspots; understanding drivers; and inferring impact. To date, resilience measurement has been dominated by objectively-oriented approaches. These rely on external definitions of resilience (often informed by outside ‘experts’, literature reviews or resilience practitioners) and measured through observation or external verification. More recently, the potential for subjective approaches has been proposed. These take a contrasting approach, soliciting people’s judgements of what resilience means to them, and getting them to self-evaluate their own resilience.

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  • Jones, Lindsey & d'Errico, Marco, 2019. "Whose resilience matters? Like-for-like comparison of objective and subjective evaluations of resilience," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 1-1.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:124:y:2019:i:c:20
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2019.104632
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    4. d’Errico, Marco & Mariani, Rama Dasi & Pietrelli, Rebecca & Rosati, Furio Camillo, 2021. "Refugee-host proximity and market creation in Uganda," ESA Working Papers 309466, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Agricultural Development Economics Division (ESA).

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