IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Carbon tax, emission trading, or the mixed policy: which is the most effective strategy for climate change mitigation in China?

Listed author(s):
  • Wei Li

    ()

    (North China Electric Power University
    North China Electric Power University)

  • Zhijie Jia

    ()

    (North China Electric Power University)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract China, as the world’s largest emitter, intends to achieve the peaking of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions around 2030 and to make best efforts to peak early to mitigate global change. Under this strategy, a dynamic, recursive computable general equilibrium (CGE) model is used to analyze the economy, energy, and environment impact of CO2 emission reduction policy based on 17 scenarios in China: carbon tax, emission trading scheme (ETS), and the mixed policy in different price level, in order to find out which kind of emission reduction strategy is more feasible. The results show that CO2 emission in 2030 will be reduced with the implementation of tax, ETS and mixed policy, by 10–13 %, 12–14 %, and 18–28 %, respectively. From 2016 to 2030, China can reduce 18,338–24,156 Mt CO2 through the implementation of mixed policy. Furthermore, relative to single policy, mixed policy has stronger effects on primary energy consumption cut, by 738–1124 Mtoe or 18–28 %, which will make CO2 emissions reach a peak before 2030 and the peak emission is not greater than 12 billion tons which is in line with the reduction demand in China. Thus, the mixed policy is the most effective strategy so that mixed policy is recommended to parties included in Annex I in United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Kyoto Protocol and other countries with large potential of emission reduction, while ETS is suggested to countries with low carbon emissions per capita which can balance economic development and CO2 mitigation.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11027-016-9710-3
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change.

    Volume (Year): 22 (2017)
    Issue (Month): 6 (August)
    Pages: 973-992

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:spr:masfgc:v:22:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s11027-016-9710-3
    DOI: 10.1007/s11027-016-9710-3
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com

    Order Information: Web: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11027

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as
    in new window


    1. Solveig Glomsrød & Taoyuan Wei & Knut Alfsen, 2013. "Pledges for climate mitigation: the effects of the Copenhagen accord on CO 2 emissions and mitigation costs," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 18(5), pages 619-636, June.
    2. Gerlagh, Reyer & Lise, Wietze, 2005. "Carbon taxes: A drop in the ocean, or a drop that erodes the stone? The effect of carbon taxes on technological change," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2-3), pages 241-260, August.
    3. Carlos Benavides & Luis Gonzales & Manuel Diaz & Rodrigo Fuentes & Gonzalo García & Rodrigo Palma-Behnke & Catalina Ravizza, 2015. "The Impact of a Carbon Tax on the Chilean Electricity Generation Sector," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(4), pages 1-27, April.
    4. Onno Kuik, 2014. "REDD+ and international leakage via food and timber markets: a CGE analysis," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 19(6), pages 641-655, August.
    5. Yongxiu He & Yangyang Liu & Tian Xia & Min Du & Hongzhen Guo, 2014. "The Optimal Price Ratio of Typical Energy Sources in Beijing Based on the Computable General Equilibrium Model," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(5), pages 1-24, April.
    6. Liang, Qiao-Mei & Fan, Ying & Wei, Yi-Ming, 2007. "Carbon taxation policy in China: How to protect energy- and trade-intensive sectors?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 311-333.
    7. Okagawa, Azusa & Masui, Toshihiko & Akashi, Osamu & Hijioka, Yasuaki & Matsumoto, Kenichi & Kainuma, Mikiko, 2012. "Assessment of GHG emission reduction pathways in a society without carbon capture and nuclear technologies," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(S3), pages 391-398.
    8. Hübler, Michael & Baumstark, Lavinia & Leimbach, Marian & Edenhofer, Ottmar & Bauer, Nico, 2012. "An integrated assessment model with endogenous growth," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 118-131.
    9. Lecca, Patrizio & McGregor, Peter G. & Swales, J. Kim & Turner, Karen, 2014. "The added value from a general equilibrium analysis of increased efficiency in household energy use," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 51-62.
    10. Li Jiang & Feng Wu & Yu Liu & Xiangzheng Deng, 2014. "Modeling the Impacts of Urbanization and Industrial Transformation on Water Resources in China: An Integrated Hydro-Economic CGE Analysis," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(11), pages 1-15, October.
    11. McFarland, J. R. & Reilly, J. M. & Herzog, H. J., 2004. "Representing energy technologies in top-down economic models using bottom-up information," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 685-707, July.
    12. Babiker, Mustafa H., 2005. "Climate change policy, market structure, and carbon leakage," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 421-445, March.
    13. Li, Ji Feng & Wang, Xin & Zhang, Ya Xiong & Kou, Qin, 2014. "The economic impact of carbon pricing with regulated electricity prices in China—An application of a computable general equilibrium approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 46-56.
    14. Feng Wu & Jinyan Zhan & Qian Zhang & Zhongxiao Sun & Zhan Wang, 2014. "Evaluating Impacts of Industrial Transformation on Water Consumption in the Heihe River Basin of Northwest China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(11), pages 1-14, November.
    15. Branger, Frédéric & Quirion, Philippe, 2014. "Would border carbon adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry competitiveness losses? Insights from a meta-analysis of recent economic studies," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 29-39.
    16. Carlos Benavides & Luis Gonzales & Manuel Diaz & Rodrigo Fuentes & Gonzalo García & Rodrigo Palma-Behnke & Catalina Ravizza, 2015. "Correction: The Impact of a Carbon Tax on the Chilean Electricity Generation Sector," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(6), pages 1-2, June.
    17. Frei, Christoph W. & Haldi, Pierre-Andre & Sarlos, Gerard, 2003. "Dynamic formulation of a top-down and bottom-up merging energy policy model," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(10), pages 1017-1031, August.
    18. Lingying Pan & Zheng Guo & Pei Liu & Linwei Ma & Zheng Li, 2013. "Comparison and Analysis of Macro Energy Scenarios in China and a Decomposition-Based Approach to Quantifying the Impacts of Economic and Social Development," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(7), pages 1-22, July.
    19. Turner, Karen & Munday, Max & McGregor, Peter & Swales, Kim, 2012. "How responsible is a region for its carbon emissions? An empirical general equilibrium analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 70-78.
    20. Wei Wei & Yile Liang & Feng Liu & Shengwei Mei & Fang Tian, 2014. "Taxing Strategies for Carbon Emissions: A Bilevel Optimization Approach," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(4), pages 1-18, April.
    21. Murray, Brian & Rivers, Nicholas, 2015. "British Columbia’s revenue-neutral carbon tax: A review of the latest “grand experiment” in environmental policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 674-683.
    22. Mahmood, Arshad & Marpaung, Charles O.P., 2014. "Carbon pricing and energy efficiency improvement -- why to miss the interaction for developing economies? An illustrative CGE based application to the Pakistan case," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 87-103.
    23. Dai, Hancheng & Masui, Toshihiko & Matsuoka, Yuzuru & Fujimori, Shinichiro, 2011. "Assessment of China's climate commitment and non-fossil energy plan towards 2020 using hybrid AIM/CGE model," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 2875-2887, May.
    24. Daniel Johansson & Paul Lucas & Matthias Weitzel & Erik Ahlgren & A. Bazaz & Wenying Chen & Michel Elzen & Joydeep Ghosh & Maria Grahn & Qiao-Mei Liang & Sonja Peterson & Basanta Pradhan & Bas Ruijven, 2015. "Multi-model comparison of the economic and energy implications for China and India in an international climate regime," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 20(8), pages 1335-1359, December.
    25. Qi, Tianyu & Zhang, Xiliang & Karplus, Valerie J., 2014. "The energy and CO2 emissions impact of renewable energy development in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 60-69.
    26. Guo, Zhengquan & Zhang, Xingping & Zheng, Yuhua & Rao, Rao, 2014. "Exploring the impacts of a carbon tax on the Chinese economy using a CGE model with a detailed disaggregation of energy sectors," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 455-462.
    27. Bowen Xiao & Dongxiao Niu & Xiaodan Guo & Xiaomin Xu, 2015. "The Impacts of Environmental Tax in China: A Dynamic Recursive Multi-Sector CGE Model," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(8), pages 1-28, July.
    28. Yuanying Chi & Zhengquan Guo & Yuhua Zheng & Xingping Zhang, 2014. "Scenarios Analysis of the Energies’ Consumption and Carbon Emissions in China Based on a Dynamic CGE Model," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(2), pages 1-26, January.
    29. Rive, Nathan, 2010. "Climate policy in Western Europe and avoided costs of air pollution control," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 103-115, January.
    30. Julia Jaenicke & Henk Wösten & Arif Budiman & Florian Siegert, 2010. "Planning hydrological restoration of peatlands in Indonesia to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 223-239, March.
    31. Liu, Qiang & Shi, Minjun & Jiang, Kejun, 2009. "New power generation technology options under the greenhouse gases mitigation scenario in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 2440-2449, June.
    32. Wei Li & Hao Li & Shuang Sun, 2015. "China’s Low-Carbon Scenario Analysis of CO 2 Mitigation Measures towards 2050 Using a Hybrid AIM/CGE Model," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(5), pages 1-27, April.
    33. Rachmat Mulia & Atiek Widayati & Suyanto & Putra Agung & Muhammad Zulkarnain, 2014. "Low carbon emission development strategies for Jambi, Indonesia: simulation and trade-off analysis using the FALLOW model," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 19(6), pages 773-788, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:masfgc:v:22:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s11027-016-9710-3. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla)

    or (Rebekah McClure)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.