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Public primary health care and children’s health in Brazil: evidence from siblings

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  • Mauricio Reis

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Abstract

The Family Health Program (Programa Saúde da Família) is an initiative of the Brazilian Ministry of Health designed to deliver free primary health care services within communities and households. The program was implemented by municipalities in different periods of time, creating variation in its availability among siblings of different ages. The empirical approach uses this variation to estimate the effect of the program on children’s health in Brazil, in an attempt to control for family and municipality unobserved factors possibly related to the program’s adoption. The results indicate that children for whom the Family Health Program was available in their municipalities during the prenatal period are healthier than children for whom the program was not available during the same period of their lives. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Mauricio Reis, 2014. "Public primary health care and children’s health in Brazil: evidence from siblings," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(2), pages 421-445, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:27:y:2014:i:2:p:421-445
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-013-0482-8
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00148-013-0482-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:pubeco:v:150:y:2017:i:c:p:75-93 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Cesur, Resul & Güneş, Pınar Mine & Tekin, Erdal & Ulker, Aydogan, 2017. "The value of socialized medicine: The impact of universal primary healthcare provision on mortality rates in Turkey," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 150(C), pages 75-93.
    3. Cesur, Resul & Güne?, P?nar Mine & Tekin, Erdal & Ulker, Aydogan, 2015. "The Value of Socialized Medicine: The Impact of Universal Primary Healthcare Provision on Birth and Mortality Rates in Turkey," IZA Discussion Papers 9329, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Children; Health; Public primary health care; Brazil; I10; I12; I18;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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