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Evaluating the impact of health policies: using a difference-in-differences approach

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  • Sahar Saeed

    () (McGill University)

  • Erica E. M. Moodie

    () (McGill University)

  • Erin C. Strumpf

    () (McGill University)

  • Marina B. Klein

    () (McGill University Health Centre)

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Sahar Saeed & Erica E. M. Moodie & Erin C. Strumpf & Marina B. Klein, 2019. "Evaluating the impact of health policies: using a difference-in-differences approach," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 64(4), pages 637-642, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ijphth:v:64:y:2019:i:4:d:10.1007_s00038-018-1195-2
    DOI: 10.1007/s00038-018-1195-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alberto Abadie, 2005. "Semiparametric Difference-in-Differences Estimators," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(1), pages 1-19.
    2. Puhani, Patrick A., 2012. "The treatment effect, the cross difference, and the interaction term in nonlinear “difference-in-differences” models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 85-87.
    3. Bilgel, Fırat & Galle, Brian, 2015. "Financial incentives for kidney donation: A comparative case study using synthetic controls," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 103-117.
    4. Sahar Saeed & Erica E. M. Moodie & Erin C. Strumpf & Marina B. Klein, 2018. "Segmented generalized mixed effect models to evaluate health outcomes," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 63(4), pages 547-551, May.
    5. Jan Kmenta, 2010. "Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion," Business Economics, Palgrave Macmillan;National Association for Business Economics, vol. 45(1), pages 75-76, January.
    6. Meyer, Bruce D, 1995. "Natural and Quasi-experiments in Economics," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 13(2), pages 151-161, April.
    7. Abadie, Alberto & Diamond, Alexis & Hainmueller, Jens, 2010. "Synthetic Control Methods for Comparative Case Studies: Estimating the Effect of California’s Tobacco Control Program," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 105(490), pages 493-505.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tine Bizjak & Rok Novak & Marko Vudrag & Andreja Kukec & Branko Kontić, 0. "Evaluating the success of Slovenia’s policy on the health of children and adolescents: results of an audit," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 0, pages 1-10.
    2. Tine Bizjak & Rok Novak & Marko Vudrag & Andreja Kukec & Branko Kontić, 2020. "Evaluating the success of Slovenia’s policy on the health of children and adolescents: results of an audit," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 65(8), pages 1225-1234, November.

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