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Household Crowding During Childhood and Long-Term Education Outcomes

Author

Listed:
  • Leonard M. Lopoo

    () (Syracuse University)

  • Andrew S. London

    () (Syracuse University)

Abstract

Abstract Household crowding, or having more household members than rooms in one’s residence, could potentially affect a child’s educational attainment directly through a number of mechanisms. We use U.S. longitudinal data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to derive new measures of childhood crowding and estimate negative associations between crowding during one’s high school years and, respectively, high school graduation by age 19 and maximum education at age 25. These negative relationships persist in multivariate models in which we control for the influence of a variety of factors, including socioeconomic status and housing-cost burden. Given the importance of educational attainment for a range of midlife and later-life outcomes, this study suggests that household crowding during one’s high school years is an engine of cumulative inequality over the life course.

Suggested Citation

  • Leonard M. Lopoo & Andrew S. London, 2016. "Household Crowding During Childhood and Long-Term Education Outcomes," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(3), pages 699-721, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:53:y:2016:i:3:d:10.1007_s13524-016-0467-9
    DOI: 10.1007/s13524-016-0467-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Leonard M. Lopoo, 2005. "Maternal employment and teenage childbearing: Evidence from the PSID," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(1), pages 23-46.
    2. Newman, Sandra J. & Holupka, C. Scott, 2014. "Housing affordability and investments in children," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 89-100.
    3. Goux, Dominique & Maurin, Eric, 2005. "The effect of overcrowded housing on children's performance at school," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(5-6), pages 797-819, June.
    4. Dale Dannefer, 2003. "Cumulative Advantage/Disadvantage and the Life Course: Cross-Fertilizing Age and Social Science Theory," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 58(6), pages 327-337.
    5. Jon Hendricks, 2012. "Considering Life Course Concepts," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 67(2), pages 226-231.
    6. Leventhal, Tama & Newman, Sandra, 2010. "Housing and child development," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 1165-1174, September.
    7. C. Scott Holupka & Sandra J. Newman, 2011. "The housing and neighborhood conditions of America's children: patterns and trends over four decades," Housing Policy Debate, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(2), pages 215-245, March.
    8. Schuetz, Jenny & Been, Vicki & Ellen, Ingrid Gould, 2008. "Neighborhood effects of concentrated mortgage foreclosures," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 306-319, December.
    9. Lisa Gennetian & Leonard Lopoo & Andrew London, 2008. "Maternal work hours and adolescents’ School outcomes among low-income families in four urban counties," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 45(1), pages 31-53, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:demogr:v:56:y:2019:i:4:d:10.1007_s13524-019-00791-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:jes:journl:y:2019:v:10:p:5-24 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Carolyn A. Liebler & Sonya R. Porter & Leticia E. Fernandez & James M. Noon & Sharon R. Ennis, 2017. "America’s Churning Races: Race and Ethnicity Response Changes Between Census 2000 and the 2010 Census," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(1), pages 259-284, February.
    4. repec:spr:demogr:v:55:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s13524-018-0666-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Natasha Pilkauskas & Katherine Michelmore, 2017. "Does the Earned Income Tax Credit Reduce Housing Instability?," Working Papers wp18-01-ff, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..

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    Keywords

    Crowding; Education; Childhood; Life course;

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