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Reforging the Wedding Ring

Author

Listed:
  • Jakub Bijak

    (University of Southampton)

  • Jason Hilton

    (University of Southampton)

  • Eric Silverman

    (University of Southampton)

  • Viet Dung Cao

    (University of Southampton)

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Jakub Bijak & Jason Hilton & Eric Silverman & Viet Dung Cao, 2013. "Reforging the Wedding Ring," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(27), pages 729-766, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:29:y:2013:i:27
    as

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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol29/27/29-27.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Joshua M. Epstein, 2008. "Why Model?," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 11(4), pages 1-12.
    2. Mike Murphy, 2004. "Tracing very long-term kinship networks using SOCSIM," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 10(7), pages 171-196, May.
    3. Courgeau, Daniel, 2012. "Probability and social science : methodologial relationships between the two approaches ?," MPRA Paper 43102, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Nigel Gilbert & Pietro Terna, 2000. "How to build and use agent-based models in social science," Mind & Society: Cognitive Studies in Economics and Social Sciences, Springer;Fondazione Rosselli, vol. 1(1), pages 57-72, March.
    5. Nicholas Geard & James M McCaw & Alan Dorin & Kevin B Korb & Jodie McVernon, 2013. "Synthetic Population Dynamics: A Model of Household Demography," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 16(1), pages 1-8.
    6. Martin Spielauer, 2007. "Dynamic microsimulation of health care demand, health care finance and the economic impact of health behaviours: survey and review," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 1(1), pages 35-53.
    7. Thomas Hills & Peter Todd, 2008. "Population Heterogeneity and Individual Differences in an Assortative Agent-Based Marriage and Divorce Model (MADAM) Using Search with Relaxing Expectations," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 11(4), pages 1-5.
    8. Elizabeth Thomson & Maria Winkler-Dworak & Martin Spielauer & Alexia Prskawetz, 2012. "Union Instability as an Engine of Fertility? A Microsimulation Model for France," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(1), pages 175-195, February.
    9. Francesco Billari & Belinda Aparicio Diaz & Thomas Fent & Alexia Fürnkranz-Prskawetz, 2007. "The "Wedding-Ring"," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(3), pages 59-82, August.
    10. Belinda Diaz & Thomas Fent & Alexia Prskawetz & Laura Bernardi, 2011. "Transition to Parenthood: The Role of Social Interaction and Endogenous Networks," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(2), pages 559-579, May.
    11. Peter Todd & Francesco Billari & Jorge Simão, 2005. "Aggregate age-at-marriage patterns from individual mate-search heuristics," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(3), pages 559-574, August.
    12. Barbara Entwisle, 2007. "Putting people into place," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(4), pages 687-703, November.
    13. Jeremy Oakley, 2002. "Bayesian inference for the uncertainty distribution of computer model outputs," Biometrika, Biometrika Trust, vol. 89(4), pages 769-784, December.
    14. Marc C. Kennedy & Anthony O'Hagan, 2001. "Bayesian calibration of computer models," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series B, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 63(3), pages 425-464.
    15. Carter, Lawrence R. & Lee, Ronald D., 1992. "Modeling and forecasting US sex differentials in mortality," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 393-411, November.
    16. Joshua M. Epstein & Robert L. Axtell, 1996. "Growing Artificial Societies: Social Science from the Bottom Up," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262550253, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    agent-based computational demography; Gaussian process emulator; multistate models; population dynamics; sensitivity analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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