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The "Wedding-Ring"

Author

Listed:
  • Francesco Billari

    (Bocconi University)

  • Belinda Aparicio Diaz

    (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften)

  • Thomas Fent

    (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften)

  • Alexia Fürnkranz-Prskawetz

    (Technische Universität Wien)

Abstract

In this paper we develop an agent-based marriage model based on social interaction. We build an population of interacting agents whose chances of marrying depend on the availability of partners, and whose willingness to marry depends on the share of relevant others in their social network who are already married. We then let the typical aggregate age pattern of marriage emerge from the bottom-up. The results of our simulation show that micro-level hypotheses founded on existing theory and evidence on social interaction can reproduce age-at-marriage patterns with both realistic shape and realistic micro-level dynamics.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesco Billari & Belinda Aparicio Diaz & Thomas Fent & Alexia Fürnkranz-Prskawetz, 2007. "The "Wedding-Ring"," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(3), pages 59-82, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:17:y:2007:i:3
    as

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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol17/3/17-3.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Francesco C. Billari & Alexia Prskawetz & Johannes Fürnkranz, 2002. "The cultural evolution of age-at-marriage norms," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2002-018, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nicoletta Balbo & Nicola Barban & Melinda Mills, 2013. "Friend and peer effects on entry into marriage and parenthood: A multiprocess approach," Working Papers 056, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    2. Adamopoulou, Effrosyni, 2012. "Peer Effects in Young Adults' Marital Decisions," UC3M Working papers. Economics we1228, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    3. Jakub Bijak & Jason Hilton & Eric Silverman & Viet Dung Cao, 2013. "Reforging the Wedding Ring," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(27), pages 729-766, October.
    4. Thomas Fent & Belinda Aparicio Diaz & Alexia Fürnkranz-Prskawetz, 2013. "Family policies in the context of low fertility and social structure," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(37), pages 963-998, November.
    5. Valeriy Makarov & Albert Bakhtizin & Elena Sushko, 2015. "Simulating the Reproductive Behavior of a Region’s Population with an Agent-Based Model," Economy of region, Centre for Economic Security, Institute of Economics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, vol. 1(3), pages 312-322.
    6. Zamac, Jovan & Hallberg, Daniel & Lindh, Thomas, 2008. "Low fertility and long run growth in an economy with a large public sector," Arbetsrapport 2008:11, Institute for Futures Studies.
    7. Pei-jun Ye & Xiao Wang & Cheng Chen & Yue-tong Lin & Fei-Yue Wang, 2016. "Hybrid Agent Modeling in Population Simulation: Current Approaches and Future Directions," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 19(1), pages 1-12.
    8. Anna Klabunde & Frans Willekens, 2016. "Decision-Making in Agent-Based Models of Migration: State of the Art and Challenges," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 32(1), pages 73-97, February.
    9. Lyndon Walker & Peter Davis, 2013. "Modelling "Marriage Markets": A Population-Scale Implementation and Parameter Test," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 16(1), pages 1-6.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    age at marriage; agent-based computational demography; marriage; micro-macro; models; social interaction;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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