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Greenhouse gas taxes on animal food products: rationale, tax scheme and climate mitigation effects


  • Stefan Wirsenius
  • Fredrik Hedenus


  • Kristina Mohlin


No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefan Wirsenius & Fredrik Hedenus & Kristina Mohlin, 2011. "Greenhouse gas taxes on animal food products: rationale, tax scheme and climate mitigation effects," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 108(1), pages 159-184, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:climat:v:108:y:2011:i:1:p:159-184
    DOI: 10.1007/s10584-010-9971-x

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Karagiannis, Giannis & Katranidis, Stelios D. & Velentzas, K., 2000. "An error correction almost ideal demand system for meat in Greece," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 22(1), January.
    2. John P. Weyant, Francisco C. de la Chesnaye, and Geoff J. Blanford, 2006. "Overview of EMF-21: Multigas Mitigation and Climate Policy," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I), pages 1-32.
    3. Schmutzler, Armin & Goulder, Lawrence H., 1997. "The Choice between Emission Taxes and Output Taxes under Imperfect Monitoring," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 51-64, January.
    4. Alain Carpentier & Hervé Guyomard, 2001. "Unconditional Elasticities in Two-Stage Demand Systems: An Approximate Solution," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(1), pages 222-229.
    5. Robert H. Beach & Benjamin J. DeAngelo & Steven Rose & Changsheng Li & William Salas & Stephen J. DelGrosso, 2008. "Mitigation potential and costs for global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions-super-1," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 38(2), pages 109-115, March.
    6. Iain Fraser & Imad A. Moosa, 2002. "Demand Estimation in the Presence of Stochastic Trend and Seasonality: The Case of Meat Demand in the United Kingdom," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(1), pages 83-89.
    7. Fousekis, Panos & Revell, Brian J., 2000. "Meat Demand in the UK: A Differential Approach," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(01), pages 11-19, April.
    8. Searchinger, Timothy & Heimlich, Ralph & Houghton, R. A. & Dong, Fengxia & Elobeid, Amani & Fabiosa, Jacinto F. & Tokgoz, Simla & Hayes, Dermot J. & Yu, Hun-Hsiang, 2008. "Use of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from Land-Use Change," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12881, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    9. Burton, Michael & Young, Trevor, 1992. "The Structure of Changing Tastes for Meat and Fish in Great Britain," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 19(2), pages 165-180.
    10. Olivier Allais & Véronique Nichèle, 2007. "Capturing structural changes in French meat and fish demand over the period 1991--2002," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 34(4), pages 517-538, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bryngelsson, David & Wirsenius, Stefan & Hedenus, Fredrik & Sonesson, Ulf, 2016. "How can the EU climate targets be met? A combined analysis of technological and demand-side changes in food and agriculture," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 152-164.
    2. Säll, Sarah, 2015. "Distributional effects of environmental meat taxes in Sweden- Can the poor still eat meat?," Working Paper Series 2015:3, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department Economics.
    3. Chiara Lombardini & Leena Lankoski, 2013. "Forced Choice Restriction in Promoting Sustainable Food Consumption: Intended and Unintended Effects of the Mandatory Vegetarian Day in Helsinki Schools," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 159-178, June.
    4. Fredrik Hedenus & Stefan Wirsenius & Daniel Johansson, 2014. "The importance of reduced meat and dairy consumption for meeting stringent climate change targets," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 124(1), pages 79-91, May.
    5. Yuhuan Zhao & Hao Li & Zhonghua Zhang & Yongfeng Zhang & Song Wang & Ya Liu, 2017. "Decomposition and scenario analysis of CO2 emissions in China’s power industry: based on LMDI method," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 86(2), pages 645-668, March.
    6. Valeria De Laurentiis & Dexter V.L. Hunt & Christopher D.F. Rogers, 2016. "Overcoming Food Security Challenges within an Energy/Water/Food Nexus (EWFN) Approach," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(1), pages 1-23, January.
    7. Ariane Kehlbacher & Richard Tiffin & Adam Briggs & Mike Berners-Lee & Peter Scarborough, 2016. "The distributional and nutritional impacts and mitigation potential of emission-based food taxes in the UK," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 137(1), pages 121-141, July.
    8. Canning, Patrick & Rehkamp, Sarah, 2016. "The Effects of a CO2 Emissions Tax on American Diets," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235928, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    9. Bonnet, Céline & Bouamra-Mechemache, Zohra & Corre, Tifenn, 2016. "An environmental tax towards more sustainable food consumption: empirical evidence of the French meat and marine food consumption," TSE Working Papers 16-639, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    10. Nigel Key & Gregoire Tallard, 2012. "Mitigating methane emissions from livestock: a global analysis of sectoral policies," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 112(2), pages 387-414, May.
    11. Edjabou, Louise Dyhr & Smed, Sinne, 2013. "The effect of using consumption taxes on foods to promote climate friendly diets – The case of Denmark," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 84-96.
    12. repec:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2016:i:1:p:95:d:62554 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Säll, Sarah & Gren, Ing-Marie, 2015. "Effects of an environmental tax on meat and dairy consumption in Sweden," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 41-53.
    14. Stefan Hellstrand, 2013. "Animal production in a sustainable agriculture," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 999-1036, August.
    15. Kurz, Verena, 2017. "Nudging to reduce meat consumption: Immediate and persistent effects of an intervention at a university restaurant," Working Papers in Economics 712, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    16. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:2:p:419-:d:130449 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Caillavet, France & Fadhuile, Adelaide & Nichèle, Véronique, 2016. "Hunger for meat: can animal protein-based taxation reverse the trend?," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235982, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    18. Linnea Laestadius & Roni Neff & Colleen Barry & Shannon Frattaroli, 2013. "Meat consumption and climate change: the role of non-governmental organizations," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 120(1), pages 25-38, September.

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