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Meat Demand in the UK: A Differential Approach

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  • Fousekis, Panos
  • Revell, Brian J.

Abstract

A differential approach is employed to analyze demand for meat in the United Kingdom during 1989-99. Differential demand systems with fixed price effects (Rotterdam and CBS) better explain consumers' retail purchase allocation decisions for beef, lamb, pork, bacon and poultry compared with models containing variable price effects (NBR and differential AIDS). The real expenditure and the Hicksian demand elasticities are generally found to be quite different from earlier studies using AIDS models. A quality change index of meat consumption is constructed from the estimated CBS model estimation results and decomposed into real expenditure, substitution, trend, seasonal and residual effects.

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  • Fousekis, Panos & Revell, Brian J., 2000. "Meat Demand in the UK: A Differential Approach," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(1), pages 11-19, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jagaec:v:32:y:2000:i:01:p:11-19_02
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    Cited by:

    1. Panos Fousekis & Brian J. Revell, 2002. "Primary Demand for Red Meats in the United Kingdom," Cahiers d'Economie et Sociologie Rurales, INRA Department of Economics, vol. 63, pages 31-50.
    2. Fousekis, Panos & Revell, Brian J., 2000. "Meat Demand in the UK: A Differential Approach," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(1), pages 11-19, April.
    3. Yeboah, Godfred & Maynard, Leigh J., 2004. "The Impact Of Bse, Fmd, And U.S. Export Promotion Expenditures On Japanese Meat Demand," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 19978, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    4. Stefan Wirsenius & Fredrik Hedenus & Kristina Mohlin, 2011. "Greenhouse gas taxes on animal food products: rationale, tax scheme and climate mitigation effects," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 108(1), pages 159-184, September.
    5. repec:uii:journl:v:8:y:2016:i:1:p:65-72 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Sanvi Avouyi-Dovi & Christian Pfister & Franck Sédillot, 2019. "French Households’ Portfolio: The Financial Almost Ideal Demand System Appraisal," Working papers 728, Banque de France.
    7. Walters, Lurleen M. & Jones, Keithly G., 2016. "Caribbean Food Import Demand: An Application of the CBS Differential Demand System," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 47(2), pages 1-19, July.

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