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A dissection of the growth of regional disparities in Chinese labor productivity between 1997 and 2002

Author

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  • Xuemei Jiang

    ()

  • Erik Dietzenbacher

    ()

  • Bart Los

    ()

Abstract

This paper quantifies the effects of some proximate causes for the regional productivity disparities of China in 1997 and their growth in the five years thereafter. A novel shift-share approach based on input–output data is used to divide the regional differences, so that explicit attention is paid to the regional consequences of China’s specific role in global production networks (with a focus on sectoral value added coefficients). In the process, a new method is proposed to deflate the data in constant prices. The results show that regions with high labor productivity levels in 1997 generally experienced increases of the employment shares in sectors with high productivity levels. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Xuemei Jiang & Erik Dietzenbacher & Bart Los, 2014. "A dissection of the growth of regional disparities in Chinese labor productivity between 1997 and 2002," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 52(2), pages 513-536, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:52:y:2014:i:2:p:513-536
    DOI: 10.1007/s00168-014-0597-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    D57; O24; R23;

    JEL classification:

    • D57 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Input-Output Tables and Analysis
    • O24 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Trade Policy; Factor Movement; Foreign Exchange Policy
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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