IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/agrhuv/v25y2008i2p219-240.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The community effects of industrialized farming: Social science research and challenges to corporate farming laws

Author

Listed:
  • Linda Lobao

    ()

  • Curtis Stofferahn

Abstract

Social scientists have a long history of concern with the effects of industrialized farming on communities. Recently, the topic has taken on new importance as corporate farming laws in a number of states are challenged by agribusiness interests. Defense of these laws often requires evidence from social science research that industrialized farming poses risks to communities. A problem is that no recent journal articles or books systematically assess the extent to which research to date provides evidence of these risks. This article addresses the gap in the literature. We evaluate studies investigating the effects of industrialized farming on community well-being from the 1930s to the present. Using a pool of 51 studies, we document the research designs employed, evaluate results as to whether adverse consequences were found, and delineate the aspects of community life that may be affected by industrialized farming. Of these studies, 57% found largely detrimental impacts, 25% were mixed, finding some detrimental impacts, and 18% found no detrimental impacts. Adverse impacts were found across an array of indicators measuring socioeconomic conditions, community social fabric, and environmental conditions. Few positive effects of industrialized farming were found across studies. The results demonstrate that public concern about industrialized farms is warranted. Scholars often debate whether research should be oriented around disciplines’ accumulated body of knowledge or, conversely, provide critical knowledge in the public interest. Social scientists’ long-term engagement in building the body of research on industrialized farming allows for accomplishment of both objectives. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Suggested Citation

  • Linda Lobao & Curtis Stofferahn, 2008. "The community effects of industrialized farming: Social science research and challenges to corporate farming laws," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 25(2), pages 219-240, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:agrhuv:v:25:y:2008:i:2:p:219-240
    DOI: 10.1007/s10460-007-9107-8
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10460-007-9107-8
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Thomas A Lyson & Rick Welsh, 2005. "Agricultural Industrialization, Anticorporate Farming Laws, and Rural Community Welfare," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 37(8), pages 1479-1491, August.
    2. Jeremy Foltz & Kimberly Zeuli, 2005. "The Role of Community and Farm Characteristics in Farm Input Purchasing Patterns," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 27(4), pages 508-525.
    3. Marousek, Gerald, 1979. "Farm Size and Rural Communities: Some Economic Relationships," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 57-61, December.
    4. Deller, Steven C. & Gould, Brian W. & Jones, Bruce L., 2003. "Agriculture and Rural Economic Growth," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1-11, December.
    5. anonymous, 1996. "Economic forces shaping the rural heartland," Monograph, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, number 1996efstr, July.
    6. M Irwin & C Tolbert & T Lyson, 1999. "There's No Place like Home: Nonmigration and Civic Engagement," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 31(12), pages 2223-2238, December.
    7. Marousek, Gerald, 1979. "Farm Size And Rural Communities: Some Economic Relationships," Southern Journal of Agricultural Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 11(2), pages 1-5, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Jill Harrison & Christy Getz, 2015. "Farm size and job quality: mixed-methods studies of hired farm work in California and Wisconsin," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 32(4), pages 617-634, December.
    2. André Magnan, 2012. "New avenues of farm corporatization in the prairie grains sector: farm family entrepreneurs and the case of One Earth Farms," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 29(2), pages 161-175, June.
    3. Mary Hendrickson, 2015. "Resilience in a concentrated and consolidated food system," Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Springer;Association of Environmental Studies and Sciences, vol. 5(3), pages 418-431, September.
    4. Ramona Bunkus & Ilkhom Soliev & Insa Theesfeld, 2020. "Density of resident farmers and rural inhabitants’ relationship to agriculture: operationalizing complex social interactions with a structural equation model," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 37(1), pages 47-63, March.
    5. Jane Dixon & Bronwyn Isaacs, 2013. "There’s certainly a lot of hurting out there: navigating the trolley of progress down the supermarket aisle," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 30(2), pages 283-297, June.
    6. Linda Lobao & Jeff Sharp, 2013. "Agriculture and rural development," Chapters, in: Gary Paul Green (ed.),Handbook of Rural Development, chapter 7, pages i-ii, Edward Elgar Publishing.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:agrhuv:v:25:y:2008:i:2:p:219-240. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Springer Nature Abstracting and Indexing). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.