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Large Fire Disaster and the Regional Economy: The 2007 Case of the Peloponnese

Author

Listed:
  • Fotini Economou

    (Centre for Planning and Economic Research (KEPE), Greece)

  • Prodromos Prodromidis

    (Centre for Planning and Economic Research (KEPE), Greece)

  • Georgia Skintzi

    (Centre for Planning and Economic Research (KEPE), Greece)

Abstract

The article explores the evolution of annual personal incomes in the Peloponnese, in southern Greece, at the disaggregated (local community) level from 2001 to 2010, i.e., before and after the 2007 fires, in order to better understand the medium-term economic effects of these fires in the burned and other areas of the region outside the fire path. The paper considers a number of econometric approaches and ends up engaging in a series of cross-sectional regressions of income-filer figures and average incomes to study the situation year after year. Findings indicate that, by and large, no inordinate drop or rise in average income figures or income-filer numbers is detected in the aftermath of the fires, especially in the communities damaged by them.

Suggested Citation

  • Fotini Economou & Prodromos Prodromidis & Georgia Skintzi, 2019. "Large Fire Disaster and the Regional Economy: The 2007 Case of the Peloponnese," South-Eastern Europe Journal of Economics, Association of Economic Universities of South and Eastern Europe and the Black Sea Region, vol. 17(1), pages 7-31.
  • Handle: RePEc:seb:journl:v:17:y:2019:i:1:p:7-31
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    File URL: http://www.asecu.gr/Seeje/issue32/issue32-economou-prodromidis-skintzi.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Loomis, John, 2004. "Do nearby forest fires cause a reduction in residential property values?," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 149-157, November.
    2. Nielsen-Pincus, Max & Moseley, Cassandra & Gebert, Krista, 2014. "Job growth and loss across sectors and time in the western US: The impact of large wildfires," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 199-206.
    3. Card, David & Krueger, Alan B, 1994. "Minimum Wages and Employment: A Case Study of the Fast-Food Industry in New Jersey and Pennsylvania," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 772-793, September.
    4. Schofield, J A, 1975. "Distribution of Personal Incomes at the Regional Level: An Analysis for the Period 1965-66 to 1970-71," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 37(1), pages 1-11, February.
    5. Noy, Ilan, 2009. "The macroeconomic consequences of disasters," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 221-231, March.
    6. Thomas Aronsson & Johan Lundberg & Magnus Wikstrom, 2001. "Regional Income Growth and Net Migration in Sweden, 1970-1995," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(9), pages 823-830.
    7. Richardson, Leslie A. & Champ, Patricia A. & Loomis, John B., 2012. "The hidden cost of wildfires: Economic valuation of health effects of wildfire smoke exposure in Southern California," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 14-35.
    8. Saurav Dev Bhatta & José Lobo, 2000. "Human capital and per capita product: A comparison of US states," Papers in Regional Science, Springer;Regional Science Association International, vol. 79(4), pages 393-411.
    9. Hesseln, Hayley & Loomis, John B. & González-Cabán, Armando, 2004. "Comparing the economic effects of fire on hiking demand in Montana and Colorado," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 21-35, May.
    10. Sarah Riley, 2012. "Land use regulations and the returns to low-income homeownership," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 49(3), pages 745-766, December.
    11. Prodromos Ioannis K. Prodromidis, 2010. "Identifying Spatial Labor Markets in Greece from the 2001 Travel-to-Work Patterns," South-Eastern Europe Journal of Economics, Association of Economic Universities of South and Eastern Europe and the Black Sea Region, vol. 8(1), pages 111-128.
    12. Prodromos-Ioannis Prodromidis, 2006. "Functional Economies Or Administrative Units in Greece: What Difference Does It Make for Policy?," ERSA conference papers ersa06p358, European Regional Science Association.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Employment; Income; Large Wildfires; Economic Impact; Greece;

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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