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Measuring Internal Migration Among the Foreign-Born: Insights from Canadian Data


  • Newbold, Bruce K.

    (McMaster University)


As the most important avenue of spatial population change and redistribution, how migration events are defined alters the empirical measurement and the derived conclusions. Using the foreign-born population as an example and drawing upon recent Canadian census files, this paper explores two related issues. First, the problems and fallacies of attempting to extrapolate temporal trends from period-specific measures are highlighted. Second, measurement issues associated with the length of the migration interval are evaluated by defining return and onward migrations within the foreign-born population based upon one- and five-year migration measures.

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  • Newbold, Bruce K., 2001. "Measuring Internal Migration Among the Foreign-Born: Insights from Canadian Data," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 31(2), pages 177-195, Fall.
  • Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:31:y:2001:i:2:p:177-195

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Borjas, George J, 1985. "Assimilation, Changes in Cohort Quality, and the Earnings of Immigrants," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(4), pages 463-489, October.
    2. Peter Morrison, 1971. "Chronic movers and the future redistribution of population: A longitudinal analysis," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 8(2), pages 171-184, May.
    3. Dowell Myers & Seong Lee, 1996. "Immigration cohorts and residential overcrowding in southern California," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 33(1), pages 51-65, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Karen M. King, 2011. "Technology, Talent and Tolerance and Inter-regional Migration in Canada," Chapters,in: Handbook of Creative Cities, chapter 9 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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