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Peer effects in exogenously formed student groups


  • Androushchak, Gregory

    () (Higher School of Economics, Moscow)

  • Poldin, Oleg

    () (Higher School of Economics (Nizhnii Novgorod) Russia)

  • Yudkevich, Maria

    () (Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia)


We estimate the influence of classmates ability characteristics on student achievement in exogenously formed student groups. The study uses the administrative data on undergraduate students in large selective university in Russia. The presence of high-ability classmates has positive effect on individual academic performance, and most benefit is gained by students at the top of the ability distribution. The increase in share of less able students influences individual grades insignificantly.

Suggested Citation

  • Androushchak, Gregory & Poldin, Oleg & Yudkevich, Maria, 2012. "Peer effects in exogenously formed student groups," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 26(2), pages 3-16.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:apltrx:0168

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Scott E. Carrell & Bruce I. Sacerdote & James E. West, 2011. "From Natural Variation to Optimal Policy? The Lucas Critique Meets Peer Effects," NBER Working Papers 16865, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Maria De Paola & Vincenzo Scoppa, 2010. "Peer group effects on the academic performance of Italian students," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(17), pages 2203-2215.
    3. Peresetsky, Anatoly & Davtian, Misak, 2011. "Russian USE and olympiads as instruments for university admission selection," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 23(3), pages 41-56.
    4. Arcidiacono, Peter & Nicholson, Sean, 2005. "Peer effects in medical school," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(2-3), pages 327-350, February.
    5. Giorgio Brunello & Maria De Paola & Vincenzo Scoppa, 2010. "Peer Effects In Higher Education: Does The Field Of Study Matter?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 48(3), pages 621-634, July.
    6. Peter Arcidiacono & Gigi Foster & Natalie Goodpaster & Josh Kinsler, 2012. "Estimating spillovers using panel data, with an application to the classroom," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 3(3), pages 421-470, November.
    7. Scott E. Carrell & Richard L. Fullerton & James E. West, 2009. "Does Your Cohort Matter? Measuring Peer Effects in College Achievement," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(3), pages 439-464, July.
    8. David S. Lyle, 2007. "Estimating and Interpreting Peer and Role Model Effects from Randomly Assigned Social Groups at West Point," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(2), pages 289-299, May.
    9. Caroline Hoxby, 2000. "Peer Effects in the Classroom: Learning from Gender and Race Variation," NBER Working Papers 7867, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Poldin, Oleg, 2011. "Predicting success in college on the basis of the results of unified national exam," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 21(1), pages 56-69.
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    Cited by:

    1. Oleg Poldin & Dilyara Valeeva & Maria Yudkevich, 2013. "How social ties affect peer-group effects: a case of university students," HSE Working papers WP BRP 15/SOC/2013, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    2. Valeeva, Dilyara & Poldin, Oleg & Yudkevich, Maria, 2014. "Student’s social ties and the choice of specialization," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 34(2), pages 80-94.
    3. Poldin, Oleg & Silaeva, Vera & Silaev, Andrey, 2014. "Comparing quality of admission to universities by the results of olympiads and unified state exams scores," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 36(4), pages 118-132.

    More about this item


    peer effects; higher education; student academic achievement;

    JEL classification:

    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity


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