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Redistribución, desigualdad y crecimiento

Author

Listed:
  • Jonathan D. Ostry
  • Andrew Berg
  • Charalambos G. Tsangarides

Abstract

Este artículo emplea un conjunto de datos reciente que distingue entre desigualdad neta y de mercado, y permite calcular las transferencias redistributivas anuales de un gran número de países. Las principales conclusiones son: 1. Sociedades más desiguales tienden a redistribuir más. 2. Una menor desigualdad neta se correlaciona robustamente con un crecimiento más rápido y más durable, dado un nivel de redistribución. 3. El impacto de la redistribución sobre el crecimiento parece ser benigno en general, y hay evidencia de que solo en casos extremos puede tener efectos negativos. Por tanto, sus efectos conjuntos, directos e indirectos –incluidos los efectos de la menor desigualdad resultante–, son favorables al crecimiento. Pese a las limitaciones inherentes al conjunto de datos y al análisis de regresión, no se puede suponer que hay un gran trade-off entre redistribución y crecimiento; los mejores datos macroeconómicos disponibles no respaldan esa hipótesis.

Suggested Citation

  • Jonathan D. Ostry & Andrew Berg & Charalambos G. Tsangarides, 2014. "Redistribución, desigualdad y crecimiento," Revista de Economía Institucional, Universidad Externado de Colombia - Facultad de Economía, vol. 16(30), pages 53-81, January-J.
  • Handle: RePEc:rei:ecoins:v:16:y:2014:i:30:p:53-81
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    File URL: http://www.uexternado.edu.co/facecono/ecoinstitucional/workingpapers/jostry30.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Estrada, Fernando & Trujillo, Marlyn Tatiana & Pardo, Diego, 2018. "Política Fiscal, Ingresos y Desigualdad en Colombia (1990-2015)
      [Fiscal Policy, Income And Inequality In Colombia (1990-2015)]
      ," MPRA Paper 88748, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    redistribución; desigualdad; crecimiento;

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies

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