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How Important is the Intermediate Input Channel in Explaining Sectoral Employment Comovement over the Business Cycle?

Author

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  • Young Sik Kim

    (Seoul National University)

  • Kunhong Kim

Abstract

This paper investigates both analytically and quantitatively the role of intersectoral linkages in explaining sectoral employment comovement over the business cycle. We use a multisector dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model calibrated to the 2-digit SIC level intermediate input-use and capital-use tables and sectoral productivity shocks. With indivisible labor implying constant marginal utility of leisure, intersectoral linkages at the disaggregated level generate strong employment comovement across sectors. With divisible labor, however, procyclical marginal utility of leisure can dominate intersectoral linkages, implying some negative comovement. It further requires some form of the difficulty in reallocating labor across sectors, so that the substitutability of labor supply across sectors is relatively low. With divisible labor, a limited substitution of labor hours across sectors is shown to generate strong employment comovement over the business cycle. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Young Sik Kim & Kunhong Kim, 2006. "How Important is the Intermediate Input Channel in Explaining Sectoral Employment Comovement over the Business Cycle?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 9(4), pages 659-682, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:04-11
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2006.06.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Luisito Bertinelli & Olivier Cardi & Romain Restout, 2015. "Technical Change Biased Toward the Traded Sector and Labor Market Frictions," Working Papers halshs-01252508, HAL.
    2. repec:kap:decono:v:166:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s10645-018-9327-x is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Dissou, Yazid & Karnizova, Lilia, 2016. "Emissions cap or emissions tax? A multi-sector business cycle analysis," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 169-188.
    4. Sean Holly & Ivan Petrella, 2008. " Factor demand linkages and the business cycle: interpreting aggregate fluctuations as sectoral fluctuations," CDMA Conference Paper Series 0809, Centre for Dynamic Macroeconomic Analysis.
    5. Sean Holly & Ivan Petrella, 2012. "Factor Demand Linkages, Technology Shocks, and the Business Cycle," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 94(4), pages 948-963, November.
    6. Cardi, Olivier & Restout, Romain, 2015. "Imperfect mobility of labor across sectors: a reappraisal of the Balassa–Samuelson effect," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 249-265.
    7. Christian vom Lehn & Thomas Winberry, 2018. "The Changing Nature of Sectoral Comovement," 2018 Meeting Papers 277, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    8. Nath, Hiranya K., 2016. "A note on the cyclical behavior of sectoral employment in the U.S," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 52-61.
    9. Petrella, Ivan & Santoro, Emiliano, 2011. "Input–output interactions and optimal monetary policy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 1817-1830.
    10. Ivan Petrella & Emiliano Santoro, "undated". "Optimal Monetary Policy with Durable Consumption Goods and Factor Demand Linkages," EPRU Working Paper Series 2009-04, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics, revised May 2009.
    11. Yongsung Chang & Sunoong Hwang, 2015. "Asymmetric Phase Shifts in U.S. Industrial Production Cycles," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 97(1), pages 116-133, March.
    12. Emilio Fernández Corugedo & Esther Perez Ruiz, 2014. "The EU Services Directive; Gains from Further Liberalization," IMF Working Papers 14/113, International Monetary Fund.
    13. Yi Jin & Zhixiong Zeng, 2009. "Money, Credit, And Business Cycle Comovement," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(2), pages 275-293, May.

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